August 2010
Volume 10, Issue 7
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2010
Neural basis for monitoring of multiple features-location binding: an event-related f unctional magnetic resonance imaging study
Author Affiliations
  • Sachiko Takahama
    Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University
    Kobe Advanced ICT Research Center, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology
    CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency
  • Izumi Ohzawa
    Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University
    CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency
  • Yoshichika Yoshioka
    Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University
    Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University
    CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency
  • Jun Saiki
    Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University
Journal of Vision August 2010, Vol.10, 750. doi:10.1167/10.7.750
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      Sachiko Takahama, Izumi Ohzawa, Yoshichika Yoshioka, Jun Saiki; Neural basis for monitoring of multiple features-location binding: an event-related f unctional magnetic resonance imaging study. Journal of Vision 2010;10(7):750. doi: 10.1167/10.7.750.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies using a multiple object permanence tracking task (MOPT; Saiki, 2003) or a multiple object tracking task have reported the involvement of the frontoparietal network and inferior precentral sulcus (infPreCS) in the monitoring of location or feature-location binding. In general, many objects have multiple features; therefore, coherent object representation requires monitoring multiple features-location binding. To investigate whether the enhanced activities in the previously reported neural network or activities in additional regions contribute to the monitoring of multiple features-location binding, we used event-related fMRI with an MOPT paradigm and compared brain activities among different tasks using the same visual information. Visual objects were defined by 4 sets of a tilted black bar embedded in a colored circle. We prepared 3 change types: color (2 colored circles were replaced with each other), orientation (2 tilted bars were replaced with each other), and conjunction (2 colored circles and tilted bars were replaced with each other). Depending on the change type to be monitored, we prepared 2 types of tasks: single feature-location binding (monitoring only single feature-location binding) and triple conjunction tasks (monitoring the binding of 2 features and location). The former group consisted of color (to detect either color or conjunction change) and orientation (to detect either orientation or conjunction change) tasks, whereas the latter was the conjunction task (to detect only conjunction change). Behavioral data showed no significant difference between tasks. In the search for regions showing selective activation in monitoring of triple conjunction, we identified a network comprised of the superior parietal lobule, superior frontal gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, and infPreCS. In the monitoring of triple conjunction, infPreCS cooperated with subregions of the frontoparietal network, suggesting the contribution of enhanced activities in the neural network reported in previous studies in the monitoring of object representation.

Takahama, S. Ohzawa, I. Peterson, Y. Saiki, J. (2010). Neural basis for monitoring of multiple features-location binding: an event-related f unctional magnetic resonance imaging study [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 10(7):750, 750a, http://www.journalofvision.org/content/10/7/750, doi:10.1167/10.7.750. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 This work was supported by KAKENHI (19500226, 19730464, and 21300103).
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