August 2010
Volume 10, Issue 7
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2010
Dual Memory Systems Store Direction of Motion Information for Multiple Moving Objects
Author Affiliations
  • Haluk Ogmen
    Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of Houston
    Center for Neuro-Engineering & Cognitive Science, University of Houston
  • Christopher Shooner
    Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of Houston
  • Srimant Tripathy
    Department of Optometry, University of Bradford
  • Harold Bedell
    Center for Neuro-Engineering & Cognitive Science, University of Houston
    College of Optometry, University of Houston
Journal of Vision August 2010, Vol.10, 763. doi:10.1167/10.7.763
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      Haluk Ogmen, Christopher Shooner, Srimant Tripathy, Harold Bedell; Dual Memory Systems Store Direction of Motion Information for Multiple Moving Objects. Journal of Vision 2010;10(7):763. doi: 10.1167/10.7.763.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: The ability to establish and maintain the identities of moving objects is essential to behavioral success, yet very little is known about the underlying mechanisms. The multiple-object tracking experimental paradigm (MOT-EP) has been used extensively for studying how attention, position and motion cues contribute to this task. Among the unresolved issues are the relative importance of motion information and the role of various memory mechanisms. We sought to quantify the capacity and the temporal dynamics of the memory systems involved in storing direction-of-motion information when viewing a multiple-object motion stimulus. Methods: Observers viewed three to nine objects in random linear motion and reported motion direction of a cued object after motion ended. In three experiments, we (1) measured performance as a function of set-size, (2) characterized the temporal dynamics of memory using seven cue delays ranging from 0ms to 3s, and (3) examined interactions between the dynamics of memory and the read-out processes by comparing performance with partial and full report. Results: Direction reports show a graded deterioration in performance with increased set size. This lends support to a flexible-capacity theory of MOT-EP. Temporal dynamics of memory follows an exponential function that decays within 1s to a steady-state plateau above chance performance. This outcome indicates the existence of two complementary memory systems, one transient with high-capacity and a second sustained with low-capacity. For the transient high-capacity memory, retention capacity was equally high whether object motion lasted 5s or 200ms. We found a significant partial-report advantage, which provides further support for a rapidly decaying high-capacity memory. Conclusions: Our results show that dual memory systems store direction of motion information for multiple moving objects. This finding provides a possible reconciliation to seemingly contradictory results previously published in the literature.

Ogmen, H. Shooner, C. Tripathy, S. Bedell, H. (2010). Dual Memory Systems Store Direction of Motion Information for Multiple Moving Objects [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 10(7):763, 763a, http://www.journalofvision.org/content/10/7/763, doi:10.1167/10.7.763. [CrossRef]
Footnotes
 NIH R01 EY018165.
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