August 2010
Volume 10, Issue 7
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2010
Motion adaptation affects perceived shape
Author Affiliations
  • Paul Hibbard
    School of Psychology, University of St Andrews
  • Peter Scarfe
    Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain Sciences Research Department, University College London
  • Michelle Robertson
    School of Psychology, University of St Andrews
  • Stacey Windeatt
    School of Psychology, University of St Andrews
Journal of Vision August 2010, Vol.10, 831. doi:10.1167/10.7.831
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Paul Hibbard, Peter Scarfe, Michelle Robertson, Stacey Windeatt; Motion adaptation affects perceived shape. Journal of Vision 2010;10(7):831. doi: 10.1167/10.7.831.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Adaptation to a moving image causes subsequently presented stationary stimuli to appear to move in the opposite direction. Motion adaptation also affects the perceived location and size of stimuli. After adaptation to motion in one direction, the positions of subsequently presented static stimuli appear shifted in a direction opposite to that of the adapting stimulus (Snowden (1998), Current Biology 8, 1343-1345; Nishida & Johnston, (1999), Nature, 397, 610-612). Similarly, adaptation to expanding and contracting motion has been shown to alter the perceived size of objects consistent with the direction of the motion after-effect (Whitaker, McGraw & Pearson (1999), Vision Research, 39, 2999-3009). Here we demonstrate that adaptation to motion also affects the perceived shape of stimuli. Observers were presented with rectangular stimuli, and asked to determine whether, in comparison with a square, they appeared stretched or squashed in the vertical direction. Judgements were made in three conditions (i) a baseline, with no adaptation (ii) after adaptation to a vertically expanding pattern of motion, during which dots above the horizontal midline moved upwards, and dots below the horizontal midline moved downwards, and (iii) after adaptation to a vertically compressing pattern of motion, during which dots above the horizontal midline moved downwards, and dots below the horizontal midline moved upwards. In each case, the point of subjective equality (the apparently square rectangle) was calculated to determine whether perceived shape was affected by motion adaptation. Adaptation to a vertically compressing motion caused subsequently presented rectangles to appear stretched in the vertical direction; adaptation to expanding motion had no effect on perceived shape. We conclude that, in addition to its effects on apparent motion, position and size, motion adaptation can also affect perceived shape.

Hibbard, P. Scarfe, P. Robertson, M. Windeatt, S. (2010). Motion adaptation affects perceived shape [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 10(7):831, 831a, http://www.journalofvision.org/content/10/7/831, doi:10.1167/10.7.831. [CrossRef]
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×