August 2010
Volume 10, Issue 7
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2010
Orientation-selective fMRI adaptation in primary visual cortex revisited
Author Affiliations
  • Sarah Weigelt
    Department of Neurophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Frankfurt, Germany
    Brain Imaging Center, Frankfurt, Germany
  • Katharina Pohl
    Department of Neurophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Frankfurt, Germany
    Brain Imaging Center, Frankfurt, Germany
  • Wolf Singer
    Department of Neurophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Frankfurt, Germany
    Brain Imaging Center, Frankfurt, Germany
  • Axel Kohler
    Department of Neurophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Frankfurt, Germany
    Brain Imaging Center, Frankfurt, Germany
Journal of Vision August 2010, Vol.10, 914. doi:10.1167/10.7.914
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      Sarah Weigelt, Katharina Pohl, Wolf Singer, Axel Kohler; Orientation-selective fMRI adaptation in primary visual cortex revisited. Journal of Vision 2010;10(7):914. doi: 10.1167/10.7.914.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

The ability to discriminate orientations is at the core of our visual experience. Orientation selectivity in human visual cortex has been inferred from psychophysical experiments and more recently demonstrated with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). One method to identify orientation-selective responses is fMRI adaptation, in which two stimuli – either with the same or with different orientations – are presented successively. A region processing orientation should demonstrate an adapted response to the ‘same orientation’ condition in contrast to the ‘different orientation’ condition. So far human primary visual cortex (V1) showed orientation-selective fMRI adaptation only in experimental designs employing long adaptation periods (∼ 40 s) and so-called top-up stimuli that are thought to keep up the adapted level. This finding has led to the notion that short-term adaptation in V1 (but not V2 or V3) cannot be detected using fMRI. The present study aimed at re-evaluating this question by testing three differently timed adaptation designs. With the use of a more sensitive analysis technique, we show for the first time orientation-selective fMRI adaptation in V1 evoked by a short-term adaptation design.

Weigelt, S. Pohl, K. Singer, W. Kohler, A. (2010). Orientation-selective fMRI adaptation in primary visual cortex revisited [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 10(7):914, 914a, http://www.journalofvision.org/content/10/7/914, doi:10.1167/10.7.914. [CrossRef]
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