December 2010
Volume 10, Issue 15
Free
OSA Fall Vision Meeting Abstract  |   December 2010
Scotopically equated stimuli versus photopically equated stimuli in unique hue judgments
Author Affiliations
  • Nathaniel D. Douda
    Department of Psychology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA
  • Vicki J. Volbrecht
    Department of Psychology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA
  • Kate A. Godwin
    Department of Psychology, Berry College, Rome, GA, USA
  • Amanda D. Miller
    Department of Psychology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA
  • Janice L. Nerger
    Department of Psychology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA
Journal of Vision December 2010, Vol.10, 56. doi:10.1167/10.15.56
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Nathaniel D. Douda, Vicki J. Volbrecht, Kate A. Godwin, Amanda D. Miller, Janice L. Nerger; Scotopically equated stimuli versus photopically equated stimuli in unique hue judgments. Journal of Vision 2010;10(15):56. doi: 10.1167/10.15.56.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

One of the quandaries when studying color perception in the peripheral retina is whether to equate stimuli photopically to the cones or scotopically to the rods. Both methods are prevalent in the literature and while many of their findings are similar, there are some notable differences. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the differences in results can be at least partially attributed to the methodology used to equate the stimuli. Unique hue loci (blue, green, yellow) were measured in the fovea and at 10° temporal retinal eccentricity under bleach and no-bleach conditions for stimuli equated either photopically (0.3 and 2.3 log phot td) or scotopically (1.0 and 3.0 log scot td). Resultant unique hue loci were then converted to a common intensity unit for ease of comparison. Results demonstrate clear differences between unique hue loci determined with scotopically equated stimuli versus photopically equated stimuli, (e.g. in locus, scalar invariance, and the pattern between bleach and no-bleach conditions) which may account for some of the discrepancies found in the literature. Thus, different laboratories may draw dissimilar conclusions regarding retinal mechanisms mediating peripheral color vision based partially on the manner in which the data were collected.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×