September 2011
Volume 11, Issue 11
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2011
Increases in grey matter volume induced by perceptual learning
Author Affiliations
  • Thomas Ditye
    University College London, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, London, UK
  • Ryota Kanai
    University College London, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, London, UK
  • Bahador Bahrami
    University College London, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, London, UK
  • Neil Muggleton
    University College London, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, London, UK
  • Geraint Rees
    University College London, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, London, UK
  • Vincent Walsh
    University College London, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, London, UK
Journal of Vision September 2011, Vol.11, 1004. doi:10.1167/11.11.1004
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Thomas Ditye, Ryota Kanai, Bahador Bahrami, Neil Muggleton, Geraint Rees, Vincent Walsh; Increases in grey matter volume induced by perceptual learning. Journal of Vision 2011;11(11):1004. doi: 10.1167/11.11.1004.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Increases in cortical volume associated with practice have been reported after extensive training in complex motor tasks and following long-term cognitive training (e.g.; learning how to juggle and many years of taxi driving). Recent findings suggest plastic processes occurring also on shorter time-scales and it is an open question whether practice in merely perceptual tasks can have similar effects. In this study participants were trained on a motion-colour conjunction search task for five consecutive days (1 h per day). Task difficulty was held constant throughout the training by continuously adjusting motion coherence levels. After training increases in grey matter volume were found in participants' right posterior superior temporal cortex (pSTS), an area associated with the processing of coherently moving stimuli. These changes were positively correlated with performance improvements in the training task and negatively correlated with improvements in an untrained control task. These findings provide further evidence for the brain's ability to flexibly change its structure in order to deal with current task demands. Moreover, the data suggest that the well-documented effects of perceptual learning on behaviour and brain function are accompanied also by structural adjustments.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×