September 2011
Volume 11, Issue 11
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2011
Training in contrast detection improves motion perception in amblyopia
Author Affiliations
  • Fang Hou
    Vision Research Laboratory, School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, China
  • Chang-Bing Huang
    Laboratory of Brain Processes, Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, USA
  • Liming Tao
    Department of Ophthalmology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, China
  • Lixia Feng
    Department of Ophthalmology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, China
  • Yifeng Zhou
    Vision Research Laboratory, School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, China
  • Zhong-lin Lu
    Vision Research Laboratory, School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, China
Journal of Vision September 2011, Vol.11, 1008. doi:10.1167/11.11.1008
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Fang Hou, Chang-Bing Huang, Liming Tao, Lixia Feng, Yifeng Zhou, Zhong-lin Lu; Training in contrast detection improves motion perception in amblyopia. Journal of Vision 2011;11(11):1008. doi: 10.1167/11.11.1008.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Many recent studies have suggested that perceptual learning could be a potential treatment for adults with amblyopia. One critical concern is whether training with one particular stimulus and task generalizes to other stimuli and tasks. Huang, Zhou, & Lu (2008) examined the issue in the spatial domain and found that the improvement at the training frequency could generalize to other spatial frequencies; and the bandwidth of the improvement was much broader in amblyopic vision than in normal vision. Here, we evaluated the bandwidth of perceptual learning in amblyopic vision in the temporal domain. Previous studies on motion deficits in amblyopia (Qiu et al., 2006) suggested that they are caused by spatial vision deficits. We hypothesized that training in the spatial domain could benefit motion perception. Seven anisometropic and two strabismic adult amblyopes (age: 22.1 ± 5.64) were trained in a contrast detection task using a 3 × 3 deg, 118 ms Gabors at their individual cutoff spatial frequency in their amblyopic eye for 10 days. Spatial contrast sensitivity functions and temporal modulation transfer functions for both motion detection and discrimination were measured for both eyes before and after training. In the amblyopic eye, training in Gabor detection near cutoff spatial frequency improved (1) contrast sensitivity by 6.6 dB across spatial frequencies, with a bandwidth of 4.4 (SE = 0.05) octaves, (2) sensitivity of motion detection and discrimination by 3.2 and 3.7 dB across temporal frequencies, respectively, with bandwidths of improvement of 3.9 (SE = 0.1) and 3.1 (SE = 0.05) octaves, and (3) visual acuity by 3.2 dB. The fellow eye also showed small amount of improvements. Control subjects who received no training showed no obvious improvement in any measurements. These results demonstrate substantial plasticity in the amblyopic visual system, and provide new empirical support for perceptual learning as a potential treatment for amblyopia.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×