September 2011
Volume 11, Issue 11
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2011
Contextual associations facilitate long-term memory of visual details in barely seen pictures
Author Affiliations
  • Nurit Gronau
    Department of Psychology, The Open University of Israel, Israel
  • Meytal Shachar
    Department of Psychology, The Open University of Israel, Israel
  • Yifat Rosenberg
    Department of Psychology, The Open University of Israel, Israel
    Department of Psychology, Tel-Aviv University, Israel
Journal of Vision September 2011, Vol.11, 1127. doi:10.1167/11.11.1127
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Nurit Gronau, Meytal Shachar, Yifat Rosenberg; Contextual associations facilitate long-term memory of visual details in barely seen pictures. Journal of Vision 2011;11(11):1127. doi: 10.1167/11.11.1127.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Objects typically appear within cluttered scenes, where they compete for limited processing resources. Visual contextual regularities may streamline object recognition, by reducing input complexity and by increasing scene coherence. What is the nature of memory-encoding of object-to-object contextual associations during a brief visual glance? Ample research has suggested that under very rapid viewing conditions only the ‘gist’ of a scene is grasped, while little visual detail is accessed and retained in long-term memory. In the present research we investigated whether contextual associations may enhance memory of visual details, even when objects are merely glimpsed. Participants viewed pairs of contextually-related and unrelated objects (e.g., a kettle and a mug; a shovel and a vase, respectively), presented for an extremely short exposure duration (24 ms, masked). Subsequently, participants performed a memory-recognition test, in which one of two objects within a pair was replaced by a novel object from the same basic category. Participants differentiated old objects from novel object exemplars, while these were presented with their original counterpart pair object. Results demonstrated higher levels of correct recognition for contextually-related than for unrelated object pairs (recognition rates in the latter did not differ from chance level). Furthermore, when object stimuli in the recognition test appeared alone, i.e., without a corresponding pair object serving as a memory-retrieval cue, results remained virtually identical. Namely, memory for specific visual details remained higher for objects initially appearing within contextually-related, than unrelated, object pairs. These results strongly suggest that while contextual information may provide a coarse ‘schema’ that enables memory of meaningful visual input (i.e., the ‘gist’of a scene), it also enhances the representation of specific visual details in the scene, even within a mere glimpse.

Supported by teh National Institute for Psychobiology in Israel - Founded by the Charles E. Smith Family. 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×