September 2011
Volume 11, Issue 11
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2011
The effect of mask contrast on spatiotemporal masking in younger and older subjects
Author Affiliations
  • Lindsay E. Farber
    McMaster Integrative Neuroscience Discovery & Study, McMaster University, Canada
  • Allison B. Sekuler
    McMaster Integrative Neuroscience Discovery & Study, McMaster University, Canada
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, Canada
  • Patrick J. Bennett
    McMaster Integrative Neuroscience Discovery & Study, McMaster University, Canada
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, Canada
Journal of Vision September 2011, Vol.11, 1181. doi:10.1167/11.11.1181
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Lindsay E. Farber, Allison B. Sekuler, Patrick J. Bennett; The effect of mask contrast on spatiotemporal masking in younger and older subjects. Journal of Vision 2011;11(11):1181. doi: 10.1167/11.11.1181.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Although there is evidence for weaker centre-surround interactions in older subjects in tasks using dynamic stimuli (Betts et al., Neuron, 45(3), 361-6, 2005; Betts et al., J Vis, 9(1):25, 1–15, 2009), the effect of the surround is much stronger for older adults in tests of perceived contrast (Karas et al., J Vis, 9(5):11, 1–9, 2009). Previously, we measured detection thresholds for a horizontal 3.5 cycles-per-degree Gabor target masked by a small central sine wave mask, a surround sine wave annulus, and a combination mask (centre-plus-surround) of the same spatial frequency. Target onset, relative to the 40% contrast mask, varied across conditions. The shapes of the overlay masking functions obtained from younger and older subjects were similar to those found for young subjects by Saarela and Herzog (J Vis, 8(3):23, 1–10, 2008), but the overall level of masking was lower in older subjects. One potential explanation for this age difference is older subjects had lower contrast sensitivity for the mask. The current experiment tests this hypothesis by measuring masking functions with different mask contrasts ranging from 10% to 80%. We found that varying contrast had different effects on masking in younger and older subjects, and that the age difference could not be explained by a difference in contrast sensitivity. Our results suggest that the relative strength of age-related changes in centre-surround interactions depend on the spatiotemporal properties of the stimulus.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×