September 2011
Volume 11, Issue 11
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2011
Inter-feature Transfer Of Aftereffects: Evidence of Adaptation in Whole Face Representations
Author Affiliations
  • Maryam Dosani
    Department of Medicine (Neurology), University of British Columbia, USA
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia, USA
  • Raika Pancaroglu
    Department of Medicine (Neurology), University of British Columbia, USA
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia, USA
  • Ipek Oruç
    Department of Medicine (Neurology), University of British Columbia, USA
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia, USA
  • Jason J. S. Barton
    Department of Medicine (Neurology), University of British Columbia, USA
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia, USA
Journal of Vision September 2011, Vol.11, 609. doi:10.1167/11.11.609
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      Maryam Dosani, Raika Pancaroglu, Ipek Oruç, Jason J. S. Barton; Inter-feature Transfer Of Aftereffects: Evidence of Adaptation in Whole Face Representations. Journal of Vision 2011;11(11):609. doi: 10.1167/11.11.609.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Background: It is hypothesized that upright faces are represented holistically in the human visual system, with only local part-based feature representations for inverted faces. Objective: To test this, we used a novel inter-feature adaptation transfer technique to determine if face aftereffects resulted from adaptation in whole-face representations. Method: We divided face images into upper and lower halves, and examined first if each half created aftereffects for its own perception (within-feature adaptation), and second if each half created aftereffects for perception of the other half (inter-feature transfer). This was done for upright face identity, inverted face identity, and expression judgments for upright happy versus sad faces. Results: Inter-feature transfer of adaptation was significant for upright face identity, and equivalent in magnitude to within-feature adaptation. No significant inter-feature transfer was found for inverted identity aftereffects. For upright facial expression, we found robust within-feature adaptation but no inter-feature transfer. Conclusions: Most, if not all, identity aftereffects of upright faces may be generated in integrated whole-face representations, but not for inverted identities, consistent with hypotheses of an orientation-dependent expert holistic mechanism. However, our findings for expression suggest that happy/sad features in upright faces may be processed at a featural level.

MD was supported by a grant from Fight for Sight and a SIGN fellowship from the American Academy of Neurology. This work was supported by NSERC Discovery Grant RGPIN 355879-08. 
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