September 2011
Volume 11, Issue 11
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2011
The Benefit of Scene-Like Interactions on Object Identification Arises in LO Rather than Being a Consequence of Parietal Attentional Modulation
Author Affiliations
  • Irving Biederman
    Psychology Department, University of Southern California
    Neuroscience Program, University of Southern California
  • Jiye G. Kim
    Psychology Department, University of Southern California
  • Chi-Hung Juan
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, National Central University
Journal of Vision September 2011, Vol.11, 861. doi:10.1167/11.11.861
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      Irving Biederman, Jiye G. Kim, Chi-Hung Juan; The Benefit of Scene-Like Interactions on Object Identification Arises in LO Rather than Being a Consequence of Parietal Attentional Modulation. Journal of Vision 2011;11(11):861. doi: 10.1167/11.11.861.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Our visual experience is generally not of isolated objects, but of scenes, where multiple objects are interacting. Such interactions (e.g., a watering can positioned to pour water onto a plant) have been shown to facilitate object identification compared to when the objects are depicted as not interacting (e.g., a watering can positioned so that it is pouring away from the plant) (Green & Hummel, 2006). Where is the neural locus for this advantage? The lateral occipital cortex (LO), the first cortical region where intact shape is distinguished from texture (Malach et al., 1995; Cant & Goodale, 2007), is the same area that shows greater responses to object pairs depicted as interacting compared to when they are not interacting (Kim & Biederman, in press; Roberts & Humphreys, 2010). However it is possible that the intraparietal sulcus (IPS), engaged by attentional demands (e.g., Kanwisher & Wojciulik, 2000), modulates the activity in LO. To test this hypothesis, we delivered transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to LO and IPS while subjects detected a target object that was or was not interacting with another object to form a scene. TMS delivered to LO but not IPS abolished the facilitation of object identification for interacting objects compared to non-interacting depictions observed in the absence of TMS, suggesting that it is LO and not IPS that is critical in the coding object interactions.

NSF 04-20794, 05-31177, 06-17699 to I.B. and NSF 10-15645 to J.G.K. 
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