September 2011
Volume 11, Issue 11
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2011
Temporal Aspect of Motor Performance's Effect on Perception
Author Affiliations
  • Bruce Bridgeman
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Santa Cruz
  • Adam Cooper
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Santa Cruz
  • Cassidy Sterling
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Santa Cruz
  • Michael Bacon
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Santa Cruz
Journal of Vision September 2011, Vol.11, 956. doi:10.1167/11.11.956
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      Bruce Bridgeman, Adam Cooper, Cassidy Sterling, Michael Bacon; Temporal Aspect of Motor Performance's Effect on Perception. Journal of Vision 2011;11(11):956. doi: 10.1167/11.11.956.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

While motor performance can modify perception (Witt & Proffitt, 2005; Witt, Linkenauger, Backdash, & Proffitt, 2008), the time course of this change remains unclear because previous experiments have assessed perception only after the experimental action has occurred. To address this issue, we had participants throw a ball into various sized holes and report, in a haptic (experiment 1) or verbal manner (experiment 2), how large the hole appeared to be. Participants gave this report under one of three conditions: 1) concurrent with their throw of the ball, using video recording of unseen fingers; 2) immediately after the throw, while the hole is still visible; and 3) immediately after the throw, while the hole is not visible. The results were divided into successful and unsuccessful trials. Perception was altered only in Condition 3 for both experiments, indicating that the effect of performance on perception occurs only after the act of throwing, in a style similar to memory.

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