August 2012
Volume 12, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2012
Contact affects the own-age bias and neural correlates of face memory in elderly participants
Author Affiliations
  • Jessica Komes
    DFG Research Unit Person Perception & Department of General Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena
  • Stefan R. Schweinberger
    DFG Research Unit Person Perception & Department of General Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena
  • Holger Wiese
    DFG Research Unit Person Perception & Department of General Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena
Journal of Vision August 2012, Vol.12, 25. doi:10.1167/12.9.25
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    • Get Citation

      Jessica Komes, Stefan R. Schweinberger, Holger Wiese; Contact affects the own-age bias and neural correlates of face memory in elderly participants. Journal of Vision 2012;12(9):25. doi: 10.1167/12.9.25.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Previous studies revealed consistently enhanced recognition memory for same- as compared to other-age faces (own-age bias, OAB) in young adults, but inconsistent results in elderly participants. To resolve these discrepancies, we examined recognition memory and event-related potentials (ERPs) for young and old faces in young participants and two elderly groups, which either reported high or low degrees of daily contact with elderly relative to younger persons. As expected, young adults showed more accurate memory for young versus old faces. While no OAB was found in old/low contact participants, old/high contact participants were more accurate with old versus young faces. ERPs in young adults revealed a parietal old/new effect from 500-800 ms (hits > correct rejections) for young but not old faces. While no old/new effect was seen in the old/low contact group, the old/high contact participants exhibited a prominent reversed old/new effect (hits <correct rejections) for old faces. These results suggest that contact may account for earlier discrepant results with regard to the OAB in elderly participants. A behavioral OAB in elderly participants may depend on high degrees of contact towards old people. Moreover, the pattern of ERP old/new effects suggests that contact may affect recollection-based face memory.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2012

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