August 2012
Volume 12, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2012
Chromatic similarity affects color-motion binding errors
Author Affiliations
  • Wei Wang
    Psychology, University of Chicago\nVisual Science Laboratories, Institute for Mind and Biology, University of Chicago
  • Steven Shevell
    Psychology, University of Chicago\nVisual Science Laboratories, Institute for Mind and Biology, University of Chicago
Journal of Vision August 2012, Vol.12, 70. doi:10.1167/12.9.70
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      Wei Wang, Steven Shevell; Chromatic similarity affects color-motion binding errors. Journal of Vision 2012;12(9):70. doi: 10.1167/12.9.70.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: Color-motion binding errors are well known, with peripheral upward moving dots of one color (e.g., red) perceived to move in the opposite direction (downward) when central dots of the same color move in the downward direction (Wu et al., 2004). This study investigated how chromatic similarity between central and peripheral stimuli affected color-motion binding errors. METHODS: A 28×22 deg stimulus had separate central and peripheral fields (similar to Wu et al., 2004). In the central field, half the dots moved in one vertical direction and had one color, and the other half moved in the opposite direction and had a different color (e.g., red dots moved upward and green dots downward). In the periphery, the moving dots were similar but with opposite directions (red downward, green upward). One chromaticity (green) was held constant in both center and periphery, and the other chromaticity (red) was constant in the center. The second chromaticity in the periphery was varied. Observers fixated in the center of the field, and responded by pressing pre-assigned buttons to report the perceived direction of the moving peripheral dots. The proportion of viewing time with a peripheral binding error was recorded during a 20 sec presentation period. RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS: When the color of the peripheral dots was the same as in the center (both red), the binding-error rate was high (similar to Wu et al., 2004). However, when the peripheral dots had other colors (e.g., orange or yellow), the binding-error rate declined as the similarity between central and peripheral chromaticities decreased. This reveals that the degree of chromatic similarity regulates color-motion binding errors.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2012

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