August 2012
Volume 12, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2012
Accommodative Lag is Not Predictive of Diminished Reading Speeds in Natural Settings
Author Affiliations
  • Stefanie A. Drew
    College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences
  • Amy E. Escobar
    College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences
  • Chris Chase
    College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences
  • Chunming Liu
    College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences
  • Efrain Castellanos
    College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences
  • Lawrence Stark
    Southern California College of Optometry
  • Eric Borsting
    Southern California College of Optometry
Journal of Vision August 2012, Vol.12, 525. doi:10.1167/12.9.525
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      Stefanie A. Drew, Amy E. Escobar, Chris Chase, Chunming Liu, Efrain Castellanos, Lawrence Stark, Eric Borsting; Accommodative Lag is Not Predictive of Diminished Reading Speeds in Natural Settings. Journal of Vision 2012;12(9):525. doi: 10.1167/12.9.525.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Jainta et al., IOVS 2011,11-8237, have reported that reading blurred text does not significantly affect reading comprehension, though it does result in increased reading times. These data were obtained by presenting text in an unnatural reading context, utilizing blurred sentences selected from a predetermined list. Here we investigate the effects of accommodative lag on reading speeds during a more natural reading task where text blur was caused by individual variability in accommodative function. Continuous recordings of accommodative responses were made using a WAM-5500 autorefractor for 10 minutes while participants read a passage from a children’s story. Participants showed considerable variability in accommodation lag with many responding outside the depth of focus, yet reading speed was comparable across all participants and did not correlate with changes in accommodation during the 10 minute recording. These preliminary findings suggest that under natural reading conditions, individual variability in accommodative function does not affect reading speeds.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2012

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