August 2012
Volume 12, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2012
Weak Accommodation in Asymptomatic Young Adults
Author Affiliations
  • Amy E. Escobar
    College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences
  • Stefanie A. Drew
    College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences
  • Chris Chase
    College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences
  • Chunming Liu
    College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences
  • Efrain Castellanos
    College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences
  • Eric Borsting
    Southern California College of Optometry
  • Lawrence Stark
    Southern California College of Optometry
Journal of Vision August 2012, Vol.12, 526. doi:10.1167/12.9.526
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    • Get Citation

      Amy E. Escobar, Stefanie A. Drew, Chris Chase, Chunming Liu, Efrain Castellanos, Eric Borsting, Lawrence Stark; Weak Accommodation in Asymptomatic Young Adults. Journal of Vision 2012;12(9):526. doi: 10.1167/12.9.526.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Weak accommodative function does not always predict visual discomfort symptoms during near work (Chase C, Tosha C, Borsting E, Ridder WH. Visual discomfort and objective measures of static accommodation, Optom Vis Sci 2009;86:883-89). This study examined the possibility that individuals with weak accommodation may remain asymptomatic through a compensatory vergence response. Both binocular and monocular continuous autorefraction data was collected using a Grand-Seiko WAM-5500 autorefractor while young adults read a passage from a children’s story for 10 minutes. Participants’ scores on the Conlon survey (Conlon EG, Lovegrove WJ, Chekaluk E, Pattison PE. Measuring visual discomfort. Vis Cogn 1999;6:637-63) provided a measure of their visual discomfort. For some of the participants with low near work visual discomfort, accommodation lags in the monocular and binocular conditions were comparable and well within depth of focus. However, there was a subset of asymptomatic participants who exhibited a large lag outside the depth of focus in the monocular condition that decreased in the binocular condition. This may be due to a strong vergence system that compensated for weak accommodation. When they perform a binocular task such as reading in a natural setting, their vergence system affords them the ability to perform near work with relatively little discomfort even though they do not have a strong accommodative response. Objective measures of accommodation, such as autorefraction, can identify asymptomatic individuals who have weak accommodative function by comparing the accommodation lag during binocular and monocular tasks.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2012

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