August 2012
Volume 12, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2012
Perception of apparent motion in a split-brain observer.
Author Affiliations
  • Tomas Knapen
    Brain & Cognition, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
  • Yair Pinto
    Brain & Cognition, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
  • H. Steven Scholte
    Brain & Cognition, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
  • Victor Lamme
    Brain & Cognition, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
  • Nicoletta Foschi
    Department of Neuroscience, Università Politecnica della Marche, Ancona, Italy
  • Mara Fabri
    Department of Neuroscience, Università Politecnica della Marche, Ancona, Italy
Journal of Vision August 2012, Vol.12, 548. doi:10.1167/12.9.548
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      Tomas Knapen, Yair Pinto, H. Steven Scholte, Victor Lamme, Nicoletta Foschi, Mara Fabri; Perception of apparent motion in a split-brain observer.. Journal of Vision 2012;12(9):548. doi: 10.1167/12.9.548.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

The ability to see motion when brief and separate views of one object occur in quick succession helps us identify pedestrians in traffic, and aids animals in spotting predators and prey. The perception of such ‘apparent’ motion (AM) is thought to depend on cortical connectivity to draw correspondences between the successive views. For horizontal AM across the vertical midline the corpus callosum, which connects the two hemispheres, subserves this connectivity. We tested a split-brain patient (DDC) who had received full callosectomy, providing a critical test of the role of cortical connections in AM perception. Controlling for influences of eye movements, we find that DDC cannot see horizontal AM when the direction of motion is ambiguous, indicating that the human neocortex serves an indispensable role in the resolution of perceptual ambiguities.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2012

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