August 2012
Volume 12, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2012
Navon effect on face recognition does not depend on eye movements
Author Affiliations
  • Linda Toscani
    Center for Neuroscience and Cognitive Systems@UniTn, Italian Institute of Technology\nCIMeC, Center for Mind/Brain Sciences, University of Trento
  • Corrado Caudek
    Center for Neuroscience and Cognitive Systems@UniTn, Italian Institute of Technology\nDepartment of Psychology, University of Florence
  • Fulvio Domini
    Center for Neuroscience and Cognitive Systems@UniTn, Italian Institute of Technology\nDepartment of Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences, Brown University
Journal of Vision August 2012, Vol.12, 633. doi:10.1167/12.9.633
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      Linda Toscani, Corrado Caudek, Fulvio Domini; Navon effect on face recognition does not depend on eye movements. Journal of Vision 2012;12(9):633. doi: 10.1167/12.9.633.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Introduction: There is a debate in the current literature on whether eye-movements influence holistic face processing (e.g., Schwarzer, Huber, & Dummler, 2005). Here, we investigate this issue by examining whether unrestricted eye-movements (free-viewing), on one side, and restricted eye-movements, on the other side, modulate the priming effects induced by a Navon task on an immediately successive face recognition task. Methods: In Experiment 1, participants underwent a training phase in which they were asked to judge a sequence of pairs of Navon stimuli, performing the Navon task at either the global level or the local level. In each trial of the successive experimental phase, participants were shown a Navon stimulus followed by two faces in rapid succession. The first face was shown for 500 ms whereas the second face remained on the screen until the participant's response. Participant performed the Navon task and then judged if the two faces were identical. The structure of trials in Experiment 2 was nearly identical, except that the second face image was presented for 300 ms only to prevent eye movements. Results: The global Navon task facilitated face recognition: When participants were asked to analyze the Navon letters at the global level, face recognition was faster than when participants were asked to analyze the Navon letters at the local level. We found no difference in the priming effects induced by the processing of Navon stimuli in the free-viewing condition (Experiment 1) and in the restricted eye-movements condition (Experiment 2). Conclusion: These results confirm that eye-movements do not represent a necessary requirement for global face processing (de Heering, Rossion, Turati, & Simion, 2008).

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2012

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