August 2012
Volume 12, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2012
Object-level properties influence the temporal dynamics of binocular rivalry: a test using Chinese characters
Author Affiliations
  • Tingting Liu
    Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science, Eye & ENT Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University
  • Xinghuai Sun
    Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science, Eye & ENT Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University\nState Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology, Institutes of Brain Science, Fudan University
  • Sheng He
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minnesota
Journal of Vision August 2012, Vol.12, 686. doi:10.1167/12.9.686
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Tingting Liu, Xinghuai Sun, Sheng He; Object-level properties influence the temporal dynamics of binocular rivalry: a test using Chinese characters. Journal of Vision 2012;12(9):686. doi: 10.1167/12.9.686.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

During binocular rivalry, two dichoptically presented images alternate in perceptual dominance. The perceptual switching rate of binocular rivalry can be influenced by many factors, including well-characterized low-level image factors such as contrast, size, and eccentricity, as well as an individual’s genetics. It is less understood how and why high-level object properties influence the dynamics of binocular rivalry. Previously we have shown that the lateralized processing in the brain for different categories of objects (e.g., faces vs. words) influences their relative dominance time when competing stimuli are presented in the left or right visual field (J Vis, 2010 10(7): 332). In the current study, we investigate the effect of object representation on the temporal dynamics of binocular rivalry. Specifically, two Chinese characters were used in one condition and two matched non- characters were used in the other condition. The size of each stimulus was 1 degree of visual angle and a small fixation point was placed in the center of each image. Subjects recorded their perception with key presses. Results show that the switch rate of rivalry between real Chinese characters was slower than that between matched non-characters. It is likely that the different switching rates for real characters vs. non-characters reflect their differential level and depth of representations in the brain. We suggest that during binocular rivalry, with low-level image factors matched, it takes more neural effort to overturn the dominance of a more extensively represented image (e.g., a real character) than an image with less extensive representation in the brain (e.g., a non-character).

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2012

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×