August 2012
Volume 12, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2012
Homologous mechanisms of visuospatial working memory maintenance in macaque and human: Properties and sources
Author Affiliations
  • Robert M.G. Reinhart
    Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt Vision Research Center, Center for Integrative & Cognitive Neuroscience, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37240, USA.
  • Richard P. Heitz
    Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt Vision Research Center, Center for Integrative & Cognitive Neuroscience, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37240, USA.
  • Braden A. Purcell
    Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt Vision Research Center, Center for Integrative & Cognitive Neuroscience, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37240, USA.
  • Pauline K. Weigand
    Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt Vision Research Center, Center for Integrative & Cognitive Neuroscience, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37240, USA.
  • Jeffrey D. Schall
    Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt Vision Research Center, Center for Integrative & Cognitive Neuroscience, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37240, USA.
  • Geoffrey F. Woodman
    Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt Vision Research Center, Center for Integrative & Cognitive Neuroscience, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37240, USA.
Journal of Vision August 2012, Vol.12, 1104. doi:10.1167/12.9.1104
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      Robert M.G. Reinhart, Richard P. Heitz, Braden A. Purcell, Pauline K. Weigand, Jeffrey D. Schall, Geoffrey F. Woodman; Homologous mechanisms of visuospatial working memory maintenance in macaque and human: Properties and sources. Journal of Vision 2012;12(9):1104. doi: 10.1167/12.9.1104.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Although prefrontal and frontal cortex are thought to be critical for maintaining information in visuospatial working memory, the event-related potential index of maintenance is found over posterior cortex in humans. In the present study, we reconcile these seemingly contradictory findings. Here we show that macaque monkeys and humans exhibit the same posterior event-related potential signature of working memory maintenance that predicts the precision of the memory-based behavioral responses. Next, we concurrently recorded intracranial local field potentials from prefrontal and frontal cortical areas to determine their contribution to the event-related potential index of maintenance. The local fields in prefrontal and frontal areas, but not the cortex immediately posterior, exhibited amplitude modulations, timing, and relationships to behavior indicating that they contribute to the surface potentials. These findings show that a distributed neural network, including prefrontal and frontal areas, underlies the event-related potential index of visuospatial working memory maintenance.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2012

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