August 2012
Volume 12, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2012
Investigating the relationship between visual object category selectivity measured with functional neuroimaging and electrocorticography in the human ventral temporal cortex
Author Affiliations
  • Corentin Jacques
    SHICEP, Stanford Human Intracrianal Cognitive Electrophysiology Program\nIPSY, Research Institute for Psychological Science, Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium
  • Nathan Witthoft
    SHICEP, Stanford Human Intracrianal Cognitive Electrophysiology Program\nDepartment of Psychology, Stanford University
  • Kevin S. Weiner
    SHICEP, Stanford Human Intracrianal Cognitive Electrophysiology Program\nDepartment of Psychology, Stanford University
  • Brett L. Foster
    SHICEP, Stanford Human Intracrianal Cognitive Electrophysiology Program\nDepartment of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University
  • Kai J. Miller
    SHICEP, Stanford Human Intracrianal Cognitive Electrophysiology Program\nDepartment of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University
  • Dora Hermes
    Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University\nRudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, section Brainfunction and Plasticity, Utrecht, The Netherlands
  • Josef Parvizi
    SHICEP, Stanford Human Intracrianal Cognitive Electrophysiology Program\nDepartment of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University
  • Kalanit Grill-Spector
    SHICEP, Stanford Human Intracrianal Cognitive Electrophysiology Program\nDepartment of Psychology, Stanford University
Journal of Vision August 2012, Vol.12, 1110. doi:10.1167/12.9.1110
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      Corentin Jacques, Nathan Witthoft, Kevin S. Weiner, Brett L. Foster, Kai J. Miller, Dora Hermes, Josef Parvizi, Kalanit Grill-Spector; Investigating the relationship between visual object category selectivity measured with functional neuroimaging and electrocorticography in the human ventral temporal cortex. Journal of Vision 2012;12(9):1110. doi: 10.1167/12.9.1110.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Functional neuroimaging (fMRI) is commonly used to investigate the organization of human visual cortex. Previous reports described category-selective (e.g. faces, bodyparts, houses) fMRI activations in consistent locations of the occipitotemporal cortex. Similar selectivity has also been reported using electrocorticography (ECoG). However, the precise relationship between the signals measured with fMRI and ECoG is not well understood. To address this issue, we measured category selectivity to faces, bodyparts, cars and houses using fMRI and ECoG in seven patients undergoing epilepsy surgery evaluation. ECoG signals from electrodes located on ventral temporal cortex were analyzed both by computing event-related potentials (ERP) and broadband power in the gamma range (70-200 Hz). The latter is correlated with mean population firing rate (Manning et. al. 2009) and linked with fMRI signals (Mukamel et al., 2005). Our analyses indicate that (1) category selectivity exhibited in ERP and gamma signals largely overlapped although not completely, suggesting these signals reflect partially distinct neural processes, (2) ECoG selectivity for faces was usually stronger than that measured with fMRI and (3) ECoG bodypart selectivity often spatially overlaps with face selectivity, with the former delayed by 30-50ms relative to the latter. Preliminary co-localization analyses reveal an overlap between the selectivity measured in fMRI and ECoG to faces, bodyparts and houses at the single subject level. Specifically, category-selective ECoG responses were often recorded at electrodes overlapping or near fMRI activations of the same selectivity. Co-localization was best for faces, probably due to the location of face activations on a gyrus (fusiform), relative to activations for houses and bodyparts that are located in a sulcus (collateral and occipito-temporal, respectively), and consequently further away from electrodes recording ECoG signals. Our results thus indicate an overall tight coupling between category selectivity measured with fMRI and electrophysiology, within the same subject in human occipitotemporal cortex.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2012

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