August 2012
Volume 12, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2012
Saccadic error information from second order motion
Author Affiliations
  • Katharina Havermann
    Institute for Psychology, University of Munster\nOtto Creutzfeldt Center for Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Munster
  • Markus Lappe
    Institute for Psychology, University of Munster\nOtto Creutzfeldt Center for Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Munster
Journal of Vision August 2012, Vol.12, 1241. doi:10.1167/12.9.1241
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Katharina Havermann, Markus Lappe; Saccadic error information from second order motion. Journal of Vision 2012;12(9):1241. doi: 10.1167/12.9.1241.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Saccadic adaptation is a regulatory mechanism controlling the amplitude of saccades. It is driven by post-saccadic information about the error made by the saccade.

In a typical adaptation paradigm, a static displacement of the visual target during the perceptual inhibition period of the saccade serves as inducer of the post-saccadic error. The post-saccadic error is then the difference between the landing position and the target position.

Here we present evidence that saccadic error information can be calculated without the actual existence of a luminance or color defined target. In our study saccades were adapted by a second order motion stimulus. Subjects made saccades over a static noise pattern background. The fixation location and the saccade target position were successively indicated by a red frame (2 by 2 deg). When the subject made the saccade the target frame was extinguished. Thus, after the saccade only the background pattern was visible. 100 ms after saccade offset, clearly separating post-saccadic motion information from the saccade, a cutout of the background noise pattern of the target frame moved with a high velocity of 50 deg/sec either in or against the direction of the saccade (in separate conditions) thus producing second order motion. In a standard comparison of unadapted and adapted trials saccadic amplitude modifications were found.

We therefore present evidence that visual motion information is also used to calculate saccadic errors.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2012

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×