August 2012
Volume 12, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2012
Electrophysiological Studies of the Locus of Perceptual Bias
Author Affiliations
  • Steven Hillyard
    UCSD
Journal of Vision August 2012, Vol.12, 1389. doi:10.1167/12.9.1389
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Steven Hillyard; Electrophysiological Studies of the Locus of Perceptual Bias. Journal of Vision 2012;12(9):1389. doi: 10.1167/12.9.1389.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

The question of whether attention makes sensory impressions appear more intense has been a matter of debate for over a century. Recent psychophysical studies have reported that attention increases the apparent contrast of visual stimuli, but there is still a controversy as to whether this effect is due to the biasing of decisions as opposed to the altering of perceptual representations and changes in subjective appearance. We obtained converging neurophysiological evidence while observers judged the relative contrast of Gabor patch targets presented simultaneously to the left and right visual fields following a lateralized cue (auditory or visual). This non-predictive cueing boosted the apparent contrast of the Gabor target on the cued side in association with an enlarged neural response in the contralateral visual cortex that began within 100 ms after target onset. The magnitude of the enhanced neural response in ventral extrastriate visual cortex was positively correlated with perceptual reports of the cued-side target being higher in contrast. These results suggest that attention increases the perceived contrast of visual stimuli by boosting early sensory processing in the visual cortex.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2012

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×