August 2012
Volume 12, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2012
Cortico-cortical receptive field modeling using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)
Author Affiliations
  • Koen V. Haak
    Laboratory for Experimental Ophthalmology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • J. Winawer
    Psychology, Stanford University
  • B.M. Harvey
    Experimental Psychology, Utrecht University
  • R. Renken
    Laboratory for Experimental Ophthalmology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Netherlands
  • S.O. Dumoulin
    Experimental Psychology, Utrecht University, Netherlands
  • B.A. Wandell
    Psychology, Stanford University
  • F.W. Cornelissen
    Laboratory for Experimental Ophthalmology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Netherlands
Journal of Vision August 2012, Vol.12, 1394. doi:10.1167/12.9.1394
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      Koen V. Haak, J. Winawer, B.M. Harvey, R. Renken, S.O. Dumoulin, B.A. Wandell, F.W. Cornelissen; Cortico-cortical receptive field modeling using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Journal of Vision 2012;12(9):1394. doi: 10.1167/12.9.1394.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 

The traditional way to study the properties of cortical visual neurons is to measure responses to visually presented stimuli (stimulus-referred). A second way to understand neuronal computations is to characterize responses in terms of the responses in other parts of the nervous system (neural-referred). A model that describes the relationship between responses in distinct cortical locations is essential to clarify the network of cortical signaling pathways. Just as a stimulus-referred receptive field predicts the neural response as a function of the stimulus contrast, the neural-referred receptive field predicts the neural response as a function of responses elsewhere in the nervous system. When applied to two cortical regions, this function can be called the population cortico-cortical receptive field (CCRF), and it can be used to assess the fine-grained topographic connectivity between early visual areas. Here, we model the CCRF as a Gaussian-weighted region on the cortical surface and apply the model to fMRI data from both stimulus-driven and resting-state experimental conditions in visual cortex to demonstrate that 1) higher order visual areas such as V2, V3, hV4 and the LOC show an increase in the CCRF size when sampling from the V1 surface, 2) the CCRF size of these higher order visual areas is constant over the V1 surface, 3) the method traces inherent properties of the visual cortical organization, 4) it probes the direction of the flow of information.

 

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2012

 
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