December 2012
Volume 12, Issue 14
Free
OSA Fall Vision Meeting Abstract  |   December 2012
Photoreceptor and Choroid Development Assessed with Handheld SDOCT
Author Affiliations
  • Adam M Dubis
    Department of Ophthalmology, Duke Eye Center, Durham, NC, USA
  • Tomas A Moreno
    Department of Ophthalmology, Duke Eye Center, Durham, NC, USA
  • Rachelle V O'Connell
    Department of Ophthalmology, Duke Eye Center, Durham, NC, USA
  • Stephanie J Chiu
    Department of Ophthalmology, Duke Eye Center, Durham, NC, USA
  • Sina Farsiu
    Department of Ophthalmology, Duke Eye Center, Durham, NC, USA
  • Michelle T Cabrera
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
  • Ramiro S Maldonado
    Department of Ophthalmology, Duke Eye Center, Durham, NC, USA
  • Du Tran-Viet
    Department of Ophthalmology, Duke Eye Center, Durham, NC, USA
  • Cynthia A Toth
    Department of Ophthalmology, Duke Eye Center, Durham, NC, USA
Journal of Vision December 2012, Vol.12, 38. doi:10.1167/12.14.38
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      Adam M Dubis, Tomas A Moreno, Rachelle V O'Connell, Stephanie J Chiu, Sina Farsiu, Michelle T Cabrera, Ramiro S Maldonado, Du Tran-Viet, Cynthia A Toth; Photoreceptor and Choroid Development Assessed with Handheld SDOCT. Journal of Vision 2012;12(14):38. doi: 10.1167/12.14.38.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Objective: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows examination of the human retina. While conventional OCT devices are limited mainly to adults, the availability of a handheld system has expanded the use of this technique to pediatric populations, with the primary clinical applications being shaken baby syndrome and retinopathy of prematurity. We sought to apply OCT imaging to neonatal population to assess retinal development. Methods: Subjects imaged at the Duke Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and Duke Birthing Center. Subjects were imaged with a Bioptigen Hand Held Probe SD-OCT (HHP-SDOCT) (Bioptigen, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA). For this study, only "normal" subjects were selected, defined as not requiring intervention for ROP or development of retinal pathology. Subfoveal choroid development was assessed as the thickness at the fovea (see figure 1). Photoreceptor maturation was measured as the distance between inner segment ellipsoid (ISe) presence (see figure 1). Results: The choroid thickened with age (R2 = 0.14, p = 0.005) and was associated with increased photoreceptor maturity, least distance between ISe bands (R2 =0.26, p = 0.03). Subfoveal choroidal thickness was significantly thinner in term aged than term born infants (p = 0.005). Conclusions: The lag in choroidal and photoreceptor development seen in some prematurely born infants, compared to term born infants, may be responsible for poor vision later in life. Figure 1 — "F" designates the center of the fovea. Choroidal thickness was the vertical distance measured along line C. Photoreceptor maturation was assessed as the average distance along 'P' and "p'" which represent the distance in which no ISe is present (P) and where ISe (P') is distinguishable from the RPE. Keywords (Optional) * retinal imaging, fovea, optical coherence tomography, development

Meeting abstract presented at OSA Fall Vision 2012

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