July 2013
Volume 13, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2013
A crescent edge-length illusion induced by object-based perception
Author Affiliations
  • Xiang Huang
    Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, P.R.China
  • Jun Yin
    Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, P.R.China
  • Rende Shui
    Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, P.R.China
  • Mowei Shen
    Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, P.R.China
Journal of Vision July 2013, Vol.13, 66. doi:10.1167/13.9.66
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Xiang Huang, Jun Yin, Rende Shui, Mowei Shen; A crescent edge-length illusion induced by object-based perception. Journal of Vision 2013;13(9):66. doi: 10.1167/13.9.66.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Objective: The features of figures are not perceived independently in visual images but are influenced by their contexts, for example, the Jastrow illusion. Here we reported a new visual illusion which reflects the influence of higher level object configuration on its local features. Methods: In five experiments, participants were required to adjust the length of a straight line until its length equalized to a target curve’s length. Target curve was set to be the concave (50% of trials) or convex (50% of trials) edge of a crescent shape (the length of concave edge is shorter than that of convex edge; Experiments 1, 2, 3, and 4), or one of the two separate curves of a decomposed crescent shape (Experiment 5). Results: A novel length illusion was revealed: When crescent objects were the tested stimuli (Experiments 1-4), a curve was perceived shorter when being as the convex edge than being as the concave edge. In contrast, when the two separated curves were the tested stimuli (Experiment 5), a contrast effect was revealed: The length of a curve was perceived shorter when being as the shorter one of the two separated curves than being as the longer one. Conclusion: The results suggest that the object-based perception affects the length perception of crescent edges. It is rather strong such that it overwhelms the contrast effect emerging in the separate-curves condition.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2013

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×