July 2013
Volume 13, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2013
ADAPTATION AFTEREFFECTS FOR FACE-HALVES AND THE EYE-REGION
Author Affiliations
  • Raika Pancaroglu
    Department of Medicine (Neurology), University of British Columbia\nDepartment of Ophthalmology, University of British Columbia
  • Maryam Dosani
    Department of Medicine (Neurology), University of British Columbia\nDepartment of Ophthalmology, University of British Columbia
  • Jason JS Barton
    Department of Medicine (Neurology), University of British Columbia\nDepartment of Ophthalmology, University of British Columbia
Journal of Vision July 2013, Vol.13, 418. doi:10.1167/13.9.418
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Raika Pancaroglu, Maryam Dosani, Jason JS Barton; ADAPTATION AFTEREFFECTS FOR FACE-HALVES AND THE EYE-REGION. Journal of Vision 2013;13(9):418. doi: 10.1167/13.9.418.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Background: There is considerable evidence that faces are processed as ‘wholes’ in the human visual system; however, there is also evidence of a feature-salience hierarchy, in that some features contribute more than others to facial percepts. Whether this is true of the neural representations of faces is not known, but a question that can be explored through the use of face adaptation. Objective: We used a perceptual bias technique to determine if there are differential contributions to identity aftereffects from the lower face, upper face, and eye region. Method: We selected two unfamiliar face pairs from the HVEM face database with equivalent physical similarity, as determined by a Bayesian ideal observer technique, and created full-face morphs between each of these face pairs with 2.5% increments, which would serve as probe stimuli. For adapting images, we used (1) the whole unmorphed faces, (2) divided these unmorphed faces into upper and lower halves, and (3) isolated a horizontal band containing the eyes alone. In the first experiment we compared the magnitude of aftereffects generated by whole faces, upper faces and lower faces. In the second experiment we compared the aftereffects from whole faces, upper faces and the eye-band. Results: Upper faces generated aftereffects that were not statistically different from whole faces, while lower faces did not generate significant aftereffects. The eye region generated aftereffects that were not statistically different from those generated by the upper face. Conclusions: The upper face and in particular the eye region form a dominant component of the aftereffects for facial identity, suggesting an important role for these regions in the neural representation of facial identity. This is consistent with evidence from discrimination experiments for a feature-salience hierarchy in human face perception.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2013

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×