July 2013
Volume 13, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2013
The effects of specific athletic training with an increase in velocity of locomotion during a collision avoidance task.
Author Affiliations
  • Allison Zakoor
    Kinesiology & Physical Education, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON
  • Michael Cinelli
    Kinesiology & Physical Education, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON
Journal of Vision July 2013, Vol.13, 480. doi:10.1167/13.9.480
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Allison Zakoor, Michael Cinelli; The effects of specific athletic training with an increase in velocity of locomotion during a collision avoidance task.. Journal of Vision 2013;13(9):480. doi: 10.1167/13.9.480.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Previous research using an aperture crossing task has shown that specific athletic training influenced actions only when performed in a similar context to that in which it was trained (i.e., increased walking speed) (Higuchi et al., 2011). The objective of the present study is to examine the action strategies of individuals with and without specific athletic training, combined with an increased rate of locomotion during a collision avoidance task. Participants included varsity athletes specifically trained (ST, N=4) at fitting through narrow openings (i.e. offensive positions in football) as well as non-specifically trained individuals (nST, N=3). Participants ran towards a goal placed at the end of a 10m pathway, with two vertically oriented obstacles placed 5m away from the goal on either side of the path’s centre line. The obstacles created an aperture width that ranged between 0.6 and 1.8 (increments of 0.2) times each participant’s shoulder width (SW). Kinematic data was collected using an NDI Optotrak motion tracking system to monitor heading direction and body segment rotation. We hypothesized that athletes specifically trained in a related task will have a smaller Critical Point (i.e., change in action) than the non-specifically trained individuals, when moving at an increased rate of locomotion. Preliminary results revealed that nST individuals were more cautious than the ST individuals (CP=1.6 versus 1.4 SW). Results also revealed that ST individuals passed through obstacles that were between 1.0 and 1.4 SW with postural adjustments (i.e. shoulder rotation or shrug) and only changed travel paths when the apertures were <1.0 SW. Conversely, nST individuals made infrequent postural adjustments and chose to change travel paths at apertures 1.6 SW and smaller. Similar to previous aperture crossing research, ST and nST individuals show differences in action when a task is performed at a similar rate to training.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2013

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×