July 2013
Volume 13, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2013
Development of size- and view-invariance in LOC: an fMR-adaptation study
Author Affiliations
  • Mayu Nishimura
    Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University
  • K. Suzanne Scherf
    Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University\nDepartment of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Valentinos Zachariou
    Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University\nLaboratory of Brain and Cognition, NIMH/NIH
  • Michael J. Tarr
    Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Marlene Behrmann
    Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University
Journal of Vision July 2013, Vol.13, 491. doi:10.1167/13.9.491
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      Mayu Nishimura, K. Suzanne Scherf, Valentinos Zachariou, Michael J. Tarr, Marlene Behrmann; Development of size- and view-invariance in LOC: an fMR-adaptation study. Journal of Vision 2013;13(9):491. doi: 10.1167/13.9.491.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

 Previous studies have shown that by age 5-8 years, the lateral occipital complex (LOC) shows adult-like responses when contrasting images of objects versus scrambled objects. Here, we selected complex novel shapes and manipulated both size and viewpoint of these shapes in an adaptation paradigm to assess the neural profile in LOC in children (5-10 years), adolescents (11-16 years), and adults (18-27 years). Observers were shown blocks in which the same object was shown repeatedly, the same object was shown in different sizes/views, or different objects were shown.Hidden formatting deleted. Delete this text! yes"> The results showed that all 3 age groups demonstrated size-invariance, showing a reduced neural response to the same-object-same-size condition and the same-object-different-sizes conditions. However, only adults showed evidence of view-invariance. Adolescents and children showed a similar neural response to the same object different views condition and the different objects condition.Hidden formatting deleted. Delete this text! yes"> The results suggest that size-invariance develops early but the neural mechanisms underlying view-invariant object recognition is not yet mature even in adolescents.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2013

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