July 2013
Volume 13, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2013
Non-cardinal Mechanism Visual Search Performance Parallels Cardinal Mechanism Performance Across the Retina, but may be Weaker in the Non-isoluminant Planes of Color Space
Author Affiliations
  • Karen L. Gunther
    Psychology Dept., Wabash College
Journal of Vision July 2013, Vol.13, 1015. doi:10.1167/13.9.1015
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      Karen L. Gunther; Non-cardinal Mechanism Visual Search Performance Parallels Cardinal Mechanism Performance Across the Retina, but may be Weaker in the Non-isoluminant Planes of Color Space. Journal of Vision 2013;13(9):1015. doi: 10.1167/13.9.1015.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Hansen, Pracejus, & Gegenfurtner (2009) raised an interesting possibility that non-cardinal mechanisms may be a specialization of the fovea. Cardinal colors are colors that best stimulate the retinal neurons: red, green, violet, chartreuse, black, and white. Non-cardinal colors are all other colors, including ones such as orange and turquoise. Hansen et al. found more circular (not elongated) chromatic discrimination ellipses at 50° than at 5°, suggesting fewer underlying mechanisms and thus the lack of non-cardinal mechanisms peripherally. Here I test this hypothesis by performing visual search with cardinal and non-cardinal stimuli (dot/annulus stimuli of 2.5° diameter, 1.25° central dot; 6 dots total; cardinal stimuli consist of, e.g., red/green target amongst violet/chartreuse distractors) at 0, 10, 20, and 30°, in all three planes of color space. The results so far do not support the hypothesis of foveal specialization of non-cardinal mechanisms. In the isoluminant plane, although performance does drop off in the periphery, it does so equally for cardinal and for non-cardinal stimuli. In the red-green/luminance plane and especially in the violet-chartreuse/luminance plane, performance on the non-cardinal visual search (e.g., intense-red/dim-green target amongst intense-green/dim-red distractors) is difficult even in the fovea. However, as performance drops in the periphery, it does so at similar rates for cardinal and for non-cardinal stimuli.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2013

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