July 2013
Volume 13, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2013
Unperceived patterned chromatic backgrounds induce large shifts in color appearance
Author Affiliations
  • Yanyu Zhang
    Department of Psychology, Peking University
  • Fang Fang
    Department of Psychology, Peking University\nKey Laboratory of Machine Perception (Ministry of Education), Peking University
  • Yang Sun
    Department of Psychology, Peking University
Journal of Vision July 2013, Vol.13, 1016. doi:10.1167/13.9.1016
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      Yanyu Zhang, Fang Fang, Yang Sun; Unperceived patterned chromatic backgrounds induce large shifts in color appearance. Journal of Vision 2013;13(9):1016. doi: 10.1167/13.9.1016.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Patterned chromatic backgrounds can induce larger color shifts than uniform background (Monnier & Shevell, 2003). However, whether large color shifts can be induced by physically presented but perceptually unawared patterned backgrounds remains an open question. RATIONALE: If the color appearance of an object depends on the perceived rather than physical backgrounds, a color shift should not occur when the chromatic-inducing backgrounds are presented but not perceived. METHODS: The object was a partial letter ‘S’ made of horizontal stripes. The chromatic-inducing pattern was composed of interlacing lime and purple horizontal stripes occupying complementary retinal locations. A mirror stereoscope was used for dichoptical stimulus presentation. The experimental conditions were: (1) the purple stripes and the ‘S’ embedded in the stripes were presented to one eye and the lime stripes to the other eye; (2) the ‘S’ and the interlacing purple and lime stripes were presented to one eye and a blank to the other eye; (3) the ‘S’ and the purple stripes were presented to one eye and a blank to the other eye. Observers’ tasks were: (a) matching color appearance to the ‘S’; (b) reporting the perceived layout of the stimuli. RESULTS: (i) The color shift induced by condition (1) was no less than that induced by condition (2) and was significantly larger than that induced by condition (3); (ii) the purple and lime stripes of condition (1) were perceived to be completely overlapping, rather than interlacing. The results show that even when the interlacing pattern was not perceived, a significant chromatic induction could still occur. These findings suggest that the color appearance of an object depends on the physical presence of the chromatic-inducing backgrounds, but does not necessarily rely on the perceived backgrounds.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2013

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