July 2013
Volume 13, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2013
Human visual areas invariant to eye movements during natural vision
Author Affiliations
  • Shinji Nishimoto
    University of California, Berkeley, Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute
  • Alexander Huth
    University of California, Berkeley, Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute
  • Natalia Bilenko
    University of California, Berkeley, Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute
  • Jack Gallant
    University of California, Berkeley, Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute\nUniversity of California, Berkeley, Program in Bioengineering
Journal of Vision July 2013, Vol.13, 1061. doi:10.1167/13.9.1061
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      Shinji Nishimoto, Alexander Huth, Natalia Bilenko, Jack Gallant; Human visual areas invariant to eye movements during natural vision. Journal of Vision 2013;13(9):1061. doi: 10.1167/13.9.1061.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

During natural vision humans perceive a stable visual world even though they make frequent, rapid eye movements. For this reason, it is believed that the human visual system must contain representations of the visual world that are invariant to eye movements. To investigate this issue we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to record blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals evoked by natural movies from 5 human subjects under two conditions. In the first condition subjects were required to fixate steadily. In the second condition subjects were allowed to freely make voluntary eye movements. Identical natural movie stimuli were presented in both conditions and were repeated multiple times. If a brain area is invariant to eye movements, then responses during fixation will be similar to those observed during free viewing. If a brain area is sensitive to eye movements, then responses will be different between two conditions. The overall similarity between responses in the two conditions will also be limited by the amount of non-visual response modulation (i.e., signal-to-noise ratio). To identify areas that are invariant to eye movements, for each cortical voxel we first calculated response similarity across repeats within the fixation condition. Next we calculated response similarity across repeats but between the fixation and free viewing conditions. The ratio of these measures reveals which brain areas are invariant to eye movements. We found that voxels located in early visual areas such as V1, V2 and V3 are strongly affected by eye movements. In contrast, voxels in ventral temporal areas including fusiform face area (FFA) and extrastriate body area (EBA) are only weakly affected by eye movements. These results suggest that the ventral temporal visual areas contain a stable representation of the visual world that is invariant to eye movements made during natural vision.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2013

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