July 2013
Volume 13, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2013
Cognitive style predicts the perception of visual apparent motion
Author Affiliations
  • Lihan Chen
    Center for Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Department of Psychology, Peking University\nKey Laboratory of Machine Perception (Ministry of Education), Peking University
  • Xuena Wang
    Center for Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Department of Psychology, Peking University
  • Lin Yao
    Center for Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Department of Psychology, Peking University
  • Xiaolin Zhou
    Center for Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Department of Psychology, Peking University\nKey Laboratory of Machine Perception (Ministry of Education), Peking University
Journal of Vision July 2013, Vol.13, 1080. doi:10.1167/13.9.1080
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      Lihan Chen, Xuena Wang, Lin Yao, Xiaolin Zhou; Cognitive style predicts the perception of visual apparent motion. Journal of Vision 2013;13(9):1080. doi: 10.1167/13.9.1080.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Cognitive style refers to the characteristic way in which individuals conceptually organize the environment. With Embedded Figure Test, individuals can be categorized as filed-dependent vs. field-independent. Here we investigate to what extent the individual differences in cognitive style could affect the perception of visual apparent motion. We presented participants with two successive frames of a visual Ternus display (Ternus, 1926). Depending on the inter-stimulus interval (ISI) between the two frames, participants could perceive either "element motion" (short ISI) or "group motion"(long ISI). In Experiment 1, the Target display could be flankered by two other Ternus displays at the upper and lower locations. The ISI between the two frames of these distractors could be equal to or longer (260 ms) or shorter (50 ms) than the ISI in the target display. In Experiment 2, the visual Ternus frames were enclosed by four auditory beeps, with the inter-beep interval between the two middle beeps either equal to or longer or shorter than the ISI of the Ternus display. Depending on the time interval between the outer beeps and middle beeps, participants could either group the middle beeps together ("middle pair") or group the middle beeps separately with outer beeps ("end pair"). The percept of the target display was affected by the distractor displays or auditory beeps. In Experiment 1, the "equal" distractors biased the percept to be "group motion" and the "shorter" distractors biased the percept to be "element motion"; importantly, field-dependent group reported more percepts of "element motion" in the "shorter" condition. In Experiment 2, the "end-pair" condition led to more percepts of "group motion" for the field-dependent, but not for the field-independent participants. These findings suggest that cognitive style affects the perception of ambiguous visual apparent motion, possibly mediated by the processing of distracting information.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2013

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