July 2013
Volume 13, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2013
Neural Correlates of Vasarely's Nested Squares and the Alternating Brightness Star Illusion in area V1
Author Affiliations
  • Jie Cui
    Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ 85013, USA
  • Stephen Macknik
    Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ 85013, USA
  • Xoana Troncoso
    Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ 85013, USA\nUnite de Neuroscience, Information et Complexite, (CNRS-UNIC), UPR CNRS 3293, Gif-sur-Yvette, France
  • Jorge Otero-Millan
    Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ 85013, USA
  • Susana Martinez-Conde
    Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ 85013, USA
Journal of Vision July 2013, Vol.13, 1149. doi:10.1167/13.9.1149
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      Jie Cui, Stephen Macknik, Xoana Troncoso, Jorge Otero-Millan, Susana Martinez-Conde; Neural Correlates of Vasarely's Nested Squares and the Alternating Brightness Star Illusion in area V1. Journal of Vision 2013;13(9):1149. doi: 10.1167/13.9.1149.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Vasarely's 'nested-squares' illusion shows that 90° corners are more salient perceptually than straight edges. On the basis of this illusion we developed previously the 'Alternating Brightness Star’ illusion, which shows that sharp corners are more salient than shallow corners, and that the same corner can be perceived as either bright or dark depending on the polarity of the angle (i.e. whether concave or convex) (Troncoso, et al, 2005, 2009). Here we presented these illusions to awake monkeys while we recorded from single neurons in area V1, during guided-viewing conditions. Neuronal responses, calculated via eye-position corrected reverse correlation, concentrated on the illusory "folds" from luminance gradients composed of aligned corners, in agreement with previous psychophysical results. Sharp corners generated higher firing rates than shallow corners, irrespective of angle polarity, also consistent with human perception. These data support the hypothesis that corner and junction processing starts in the earliest neural stages of the visual hierarchy.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2013

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