July 2013
Volume 13, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2013
Temporal order of attentional disengagement and reengagement investigated by steady-state visual evoked potentials and event-related potentials
Author Affiliations
  • Satoshi Shioiri
    Graduate School of Information Sciences, Tohoku University\nResearch Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University
  • Yoshiyuki Kashiwase
    Graduate School of Information Sciences, Tohoku University
  • Nobutaka Omori
    Graduate School of Information Sciences, Tohoku University
  • Kazumichi Matsumiya
    Graduate School of Information Sciences, Tohoku University\nResearch Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University
  • Ichiro Kuriki
    Graduate School of Information Sciences, Tohoku University\nResearch Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University
Journal of Vision July 2013, Vol.13, 1187. doi:10.1167/13.9.1187
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Satoshi Shioiri, Yoshiyuki Kashiwase, Nobutaka Omori, Kazumichi Matsumiya, Ichiro Kuriki; Temporal order of attentional disengagement and reengagement investigated by steady-state visual evoked potentials and event-related potentials. Journal of Vision 2013;13(9):1187. doi: 10.1167/13.9.1187.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Hidden formatting deleted. Delete this text! line-height:150%;layout-grid-mode:char">[Purpose] An attention shift has been assumed to comprise three stages of neural processes: disengagement from the initially attended location, shift to a new destination, and reengagement on the new location. We developed a novel experimental paradigm to estimate the timings of attentional "disengagement" and "reengagement". Hidden formatting deleted. Delete this text! line-height:150%;layout-grid-mode:char">[Method] We recorded two EEG components. One was steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) for two flickering stimuli at different frequencies, which were presented on the left and right of the center of the display. The other was event-related potential (ERP) to the target superimposed on a flickering stimulus. After a peripheral cue presented around either flickering stimulus, participants stayed their attention on the cued stimulus, or shifted attention toward the other stimulus. We estimated the time course of attentional disengagement from the difference between the SSVEPs or P300 of ERPs to the stimulus that was kept attended throughout the trial after cue presentation and those to the stimulus that was initially attended and then ignored. We also estimated the time course of attentional reengagement from the difference between the measures to the stimulus that was initially ignored and then attended and those to the stimulus that was never attended throughout the trial. Hidden formatting deleted. Delete this text! line-height:150%;layout-grid-mode:char">[Results] The SSVEP data showed that attention was reengaged to a new object earlier than it was disengaged from the initially attended object. However, the P300 showed that reengagement and disengagement started approximately at the same time. Hidden formatting deleted. Delete this text! line-height:150%;layout-grid-mode:char">[Discussion] The present results suggest that there are different processes to control attentional disengagement and reengagement.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2013

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×