July 2013
Volume 13, Issue 9
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2013
Individual Differences Within and Across Attentional Blink Tasks Revisited
Author Affiliations
  • Gillian Dale
    Department of Psychology, Brock University
  • Paul E. Dux
    School of Psychology, The University of Queensland
  • Karen M. Arnell
    Department of Psychology, Brock University
Journal of Vision July 2013, Vol.13, 1192. doi:10.1167/13.9.1192
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      Gillian Dale, Paul E. Dux, Karen M. Arnell; Individual Differences Within and Across Attentional Blink Tasks Revisited. Journal of Vision 2013;13(9):1192. doi: 10.1167/13.9.1192.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

When the second of two targets (T2) is presented in close temporal proximity (within 200-500 ms) to the first (T1), accuracy for reporting T2 is reduced relative to when the targets are separated by longer durations--the attentional blink (AB). Two recent studies have shown that individual differences in the magnitude of the AB are stable both within a single testing session and over time. While one study found a large positive correlation between AB magnitude when there was an attentional set/task switch between T1 and T2 and when there was not, the other study found no relationship between switch and no-switch paradigms. The current study was conducted to clarify this discrepancy by examining the reliability of, and relationships among, individual differences in AB performance on 5 different versions of the standard dual-target RSVP paradigm (three of which involved an attentional set/task switch between T1 and T2, and two of which did not). Participants completed all 5 paradigms, and then returned 7-10 days later to again complete the same paradigms. All 5 versions were reliable both within, and across, testing sessions, demonstrating again that individual differences in AB performance are stable over time. In addition, all 5 AB versions were significantly intercorrelated, although the strength of the relationship differed depending on the extent to which the T1 and T2 attentional sets/tasks overlapped. These findings provide evidence that multiple distinct dual-target RSVP tasks do share underlying variability, providing support for the use of different versions of the paradigm in the literature.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2013

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