December 2013
Volume 13, Issue 15
Free
OSA Fall Vision Meeting Abstract  |   October 2013
Towards the single cone transducer function
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stanley Klein
    School of Optometry, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA
  • Thom Carney
    School of Optometry, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA
  • Gene Switkes
    School of Optometry, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA
    University of California, Santa Cruz, California, USA
  • Mina Choi
    School of Optometry, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA
  • Austin Roorda
    School of Optometry, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA
  • Claudio Privitera
    School of Optometry, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA
  • Ramkumar Sabesan
    School of Optometry, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA
  • Lawrence Sincich
    University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA
  • Footnotes
     Moderator: Jeffrey Mulligan, NASA Ames Research Center
Journal of Vision October 2013, Vol.13, T17. doi:10.1167/13.15.17
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    • Get Citation

      Stanley Klein, Thom Carney, Gene Switkes, Mina Choi, Austin Roorda, Claudio Privitera, Ramkumar Sabesan, Lawrence Sincich; Towards the single cone transducer function. Journal of Vision 2013;13(15):T17. doi: 10.1167/13.15.17.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Background. We measured the transducer function (d' and noise vs contrast) with both cone isolating and luminance increments of tiny dots in peripheral vision. We were interested in how the threshold, the multiplicative noise and the saturation point depend on the chromaticity and intensity of the background (specified in cone catch) and the chromaticity and intensity of the test dot. The present experiments were done using a CRT display to develop optimal methodologies for extension to single cone stimulation using the Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) of the Roorda Lab.

Methods. The rating scale method of constant stimuli was used with 6 contrasts going from zero to a stimulus of d' ≈ 4, and with 6 levels of response. The analysis involved 5 response criteria plus two approaches for fitting the psychometric function: a) 5 different d' values with the blank stimulus pegged at d'=0; b) a psychometric function given by d' = (c/th)b where th is the threshold and b is the transducer exponent.

Results. For a variety of backgrounds the luminance and cone isolating stimuli had very similar thresholds. In addition the transducer exponent was between 1.3 and 1.7 for all conditions.

Discussion. A surprising finding was that the transducer exponent was lower than expected. The methodology being developed will be transferred to the AOSLO where higher test contrasts are possible for exploring the saturation regime of single cones with a substantially greater variety of background chromaticities.

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