December 2013
Volume 13, Issue 15
Free
OSA Fall Vision Meeting Abstract  |   October 2013
Perceived blur and higher-order aberrations
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lucie Sawides
    Instituto de Óptica, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, CSIC, Madrid, Spain
  • Carlos Dorronsoro
    Instituto de Óptica, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, CSIC, Madrid, Spain
  • Aiswaryah Radhakrishnan
    Instituto de Óptica, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, CSIC, Madrid, Spain
  • Eli Peli
    Schepens EyeResearchInstitute, Massachusetts Eye and EarInfirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  • Michael Webster
    Department of Psychology, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada, USA
  • Susana Marcos
    Instituto de Óptica, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, CSIC, Madrid, Spain
  • Footnotes
     Moderator: Heidi Hofer, University of Houston
  • Footnotes
     Blur has long been regarded as a necessary evil, something that we are stuck with as a result of the laws of optics. But with regards to blur, the visual system again shows its facility to turn lemons into lemonade by adapting away some of the perceptual effects of blur and exploiting blur as a cue to depth. This symposium examines the visual mechanisms involved in the detection and discrimination of defocus and higher-order aberrations, along with the subsequent processing of these signals.
Journal of Vision October 2013, Vol.13, T3. doi:10.1167/13.15.3
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    • Get Citation

      Lucie Sawides, Carlos Dorronsoro, Aiswaryah Radhakrishnan, Eli Peli, Michael Webster, Susana Marcos; Perceived blur and higher-order aberrations. Journal of Vision 2013;13(15):T3. doi: 10.1167/13.15.3.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Several studies have demonstrated short- and long-term aftereffects in the perception of blur after adaptation to sharpened or blurred images, either optically or by computational filtering. Moreover, Adaptive Optics (AO) has proved to be an effective tool for testing visual perception under controlled ocular aberrations.

A series of psychophysical experiments were performed to (1) explore short-term adaptation to the blur produced by high order aberrations (HOA) from real patients (and scaled versions) by measuring the shift of the best-perceived focus following adaptation to those different levels of blur; (2) investigate whether subjects are naturally adapted to the level of blur produced by their HOA and (3) extract the orientation features of the internally coded blur, by searching the oriented blur producing best perceived image quality in each subject using a “Classification Image” inspired method. To guarantee that all subjects were exposed to a controlled blur, images were projected through a custom AO system combined with a psychophysical channel. All measurements were performed under AO-corrected aberrations, and the projected images blurred by convolution with known aberrations.

The shifts in the best-perceived focus following adaptation to scaled HOA are proportional to the amount of blur in the adapting image. The results strongly suggest that vision is adapted to the overall amount of blur produced by the ocular high order aberrations of an individual's eye and that calibration mechanisms for normalizing blur also operate using orientation cues.

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