August 2014
Volume 14, Issue 10
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2014
Characteristics of square-wave jerks in the macaque monkey
Author Affiliations
  • Francisco Costela
    Department of Neurobiology, Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA
  • Jorge Otero-Millan
    Department of Neurobiology, Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA
  • Michael McCamy
    Department of Neurobiology, Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA
  • Stephen Macknik
    Department of Neurobiology, Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA
  • Xoana Troncoso
    Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA
  • Ali Najafian
    Department of Neurobiology, Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA
  • Susana Martinez
    Department of Neurobiology, Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA
Journal of Vision August 2014, Vol.14, 112. doi:10.1167/14.10.112
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      Francisco Costela, Jorge Otero-Millan, Michael McCamy, Stephen Macknik, Xoana Troncoso, Ali Najafian, Susana Martinez; Characteristics of square-wave jerks in the macaque monkey. Journal of Vision 2014;14(10):112. doi: 10.1167/14.10.112.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Saccadic intrusions, predominantly horizontal saccades that interrupt accurate fixation, include square-wave jerks (SWJs; the most common type of saccadic intrusion), which consist of an initial saccade away from the fixation target followed, after a short delay, by a ''return saccade'' that brings the eye back onto target. SWJs are present in most human subjects, but are prominent by their increased frequency and size in certain parkinsonian disorders and in recessive, hereditary spinocerebellar ataxias. Here we set out to determine the characteristics of SWJs in normal rhesus macaques during attempted fixation. We found that primate and human SWJs shared comparable features overall, but the likelihood of a given saccade being part of a SWJ was lower for primates than for humans

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2014

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