August 2014
Volume 14, Issue 10
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2014
Water Flows Uphill: A Visual Illusion and Its Explanation
Author Affiliations
  • Wenxun Li
    Department of Psychology, Columbia University in the City of New York
  • Ethel Matin
    Department of Psychology, Long Island University – Post
  • Leonard Matin
    Department of Psychology, Columbia University in the City of New York
Journal of Vision August 2014, Vol.14, 150. doi:10.1167/14.10.150
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Wenxun Li, Ethel Matin, Leonard Matin; Water Flows Uphill: A Visual Illusion and Its Explanation . Journal of Vision 2014;14(10):150. doi: 10.1167/14.10.150.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

A pitched visual field influences the perceived elevation of objects within the field and the elevation visually perceived as eye level, VPEL (reviewed in Matin & Li, 2010). In the present report we show that a pitched stationary inducer also produces changes in the perceived direction of motion (no movement of the inducer is involved). Specifically: a stream of water that is physically flowing downhill in a transparent linear tube appears to flow uphill when it is viewed against a stationary topbackward pitched visual field. Data showing the magnitude of the illusion with parametric variation of pitchroom orientation and tube orientation will be presented. At the poster we will provide a demonstration of the illusion with a topbackward pitched visual field that induces a 12o downward displacement of VPEL. We explain the upward direction of perceived water flow by combining two facts: (1) pitching a visual field changes the elevation of VPEL, and (2) the illusory uphill water flow occurs when the tube is set in a surface between the horizontal surface containing true eye level and the surface containing VPEL.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2014

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×