August 2014
Volume 14, Issue 10
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2014
The eye-size illusion: Psychophysical characteristics, generality, relation to holistic processing, and a role for visual experience
Author Affiliations
  • Kang Lee
    Dr. Eric Jackman Institute of Child Study, OISE, University of Toronto
  • Wen Xiao
    School of Preschool Teacher Education, Zhejiang Normal University
  • Genyue Fu
    School of Education, Zhejiang Normal University
  • Paul Quinn
    Department of Psychology, University of Delaware
  • Yu-hao Sun
    Department of Psychology, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University
  • Naiqi Xiao
    Dr. Eric Jackman Institute of Child Study, OISE, University of Toronto
  • Qiandong Wang
    School of Education, Zhejiang Normal University
  • Guowei Chan
    School of Education, Zhejiang Normal University
  • Olivier Pascalis
    LPNC, CNRS, Université Grenoble Alpes
  • Fabrice Damon
    LPNC, CNRS, Université Grenoble Alpes
Journal of Vision August 2014, Vol.14, 569. doi:10.1167/14.10.569
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      Kang Lee, Wen Xiao, Genyue Fu, Paul Quinn, Yu-hao Sun, Naiqi Xiao, Qiandong Wang, Guowei Chan, Olivier Pascalis, Fabrice Damon; The eye-size illusion: Psychophysical characteristics, generality, relation to holistic processing, and a role for visual experience. Journal of Vision 2014;14(10):569. doi: 10.1167/14.10.569.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Rakover (2011) observed a novel eye-size illusion: when increasing the size of a face but keeping the size of its eyes unchanged, the eyes are perceived to be larger than in the original face. Here, we systematically manipulated the face size and found that the magnitude of this illusion linearly changed as a function of the face frame size (Experiment 1). Additionally, the same magnitude of an illusion was observed for the perception of the size of the mouth when we changed the face frame but kept the mouth size constant (Experiment 2). Further, we investigated whether the magnitude of the illusion was affected by stimulus inversion and differential experience with particular categories of faces. We found that when the faces and eyes were presented upside down, the magnitude of the illusion was significantly reduced in both Chinese participants and Caucasian participants (Experiment 3). We also found that the illusion was more salient with own-race and own-age faces versus other-race and other-age faces (Experiment 4). The illusion reflects holistic processing because the perception of eye or mouth size occurs in the relational context of the whole face; when the face is seen upside down, thereby disrupting holistic processing, the magnitude of the illusion is reduced. The presence of other-race and other-age effects additionally suggests that experience plays a role in producing the illusion.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2014

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