August 2014
Volume 14, Issue 10
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2014
Removing the right inferior occipital gyrus does not disrupt face-selective responses in human ventral temporal cortex: Evidence against a strict hierarchical model of face perception
Author Affiliations
  • Kevin Weiner
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305
  • Louis Maillard
    Neurology Unit, University Hospital, Nancy, France
  • Jacques Jonas
    Neurology Unit, University Hospital, Nancy, France
  • Gabriela Hossu
    Centre dInvestigation Clinique-Innovation Technologique, University Hospital of Nancy, Nancy, France
  • Hélène Brissart
    Neurology Unit, University Hospital, Nancy, France
  • Corentin Jacques
    Institute of Psychology, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Louvain
  • David Loftus
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305
  • Kalanit Grill-Spector
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305
  • Bruno Rossion
    Institute of Psychology, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Louvain
Journal of Vision August 2014, Vol.14, 605. doi:10.1167/14.10.605
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Kevin Weiner, Louis Maillard, Jacques Jonas, Gabriela Hossu, Hélène Brissart, Corentin Jacques, David Loftus, Kalanit Grill-Spector, Bruno Rossion; Removing the right inferior occipital gyrus does not disrupt face-selective responses in human ventral temporal cortex: Evidence against a strict hierarchical model of face perception . Journal of Vision 2014;14(10):605. doi: 10.1167/14.10.605.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Neurofunctional models of face perception consider the "occipital face area" (IOG-faces/OFA) the input node to a hierarchy of face processing regions. It is presently unknown how removing this node affects downstream face-selective regions and the functional organization of human ventral temporal cortex (VTC) more generally. Here, we report a series of investigations using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and intracerebral recordings with depth electrodes (sEEG) in a rare patient with intractable epilepsy. Behaviorally, the patient performed well above chance level at face perception and recognition tests although she performed significantly lower than normal controls. Pre-resection, a block design fMRI experiment using images of faces, body parts, places, and objects, showed a typical topology of functional regions in VTC (Figure 1). SEEG recordings revealed the highest face-selective response in the high gamma frequency range from 150 ms post-stimulus onset in an electrode located in the posterior fusiform face area (pFus-faces/FFA-1), indicative of normal latency of face selectivity. The resection included all of IOG-faces/OFA and the posterior aspect of pFus-faces/FFA-1. However, the right calcarine sulcus was intact and the patient did not suffer from a left visual field hemianopsia. fMRI conducted a month post-resection revealed that the topology and selectivity of face-, body part-, and place-selective regions anterior to the resection were preserved. Quantifying the topology of face-selective responses with multivoxel pattern analyses in VTC revealed that the correlation between pre- and post-resection scanning sessions was highly significant (r=.62±.04; p<10-3) and comparable to the correlation between two pre-resection scanning sessions (r=.51±.05; p<10-3), indicating the stability of face-selective responses post-resection. Interestingly, the patient's face perception and recognition remained stable after resection while her response times decreased two-fold. Altogether, these observations pose important constraints on the hierarchical neurofunctional model of face-selective responses in the human brain.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2014

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×