August 2014
Volume 14, Issue 10
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2014
The Mere Exposure Effect Is Modulated By Selective Attention But Not Visual Awareness
Author Affiliations
  • Yu-feng Huang
    Neuroscience and Behavioral Disorders Program, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School
  • Po-jang Hsieh
    Neuroscience and Behavioral Disorders Program, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School
Journal of Vision August 2014, Vol.14, 704. doi:10.1167/14.10.704
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Yu-feng Huang, Po-jang Hsieh; The Mere Exposure Effect Is Modulated By Selective Attention But Not Visual Awareness. Journal of Vision 2014;14(10):704. doi: 10.1167/14.10.704.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Repeated exposures to an object will lead to an enhancement of evaluation toward that object. Although this mere exposure effect (MEE) may occur when the objects are presented subliminally, the role of conscious perception per se on evaluation has never been examined. Here we use a binocular rivalry paradigm to investigate whether variance in conscious perceptual duration of faces has an effect on their subsequent evaluation, and how selective attention and memory interact with this effect. Participants first performed a binocular rivalry task consisting of a free rivalry block and an attending block. In the free rivalry block, two faces were projected individually to left and right eye to produce rivalry experience and participants were required to report the dominant percept. In the attending task, the stimulus configuration was identical to those in the free rivalry block, except that participants were instructed to attend to one of each pair of faces. After the binocular rivalry phase, participants performed an unexpected evaluation and recall task, which were consisted of novel and previously presented faces. Replicating MEE, the results showed that previously exposed faces were more positively evaluated than novel faces. Furthermore, variance in conscious perceptual duration of the faces did not affect evaluation, whereas attended faces were better evaluated than the non-attended faces. Finally, this effect is not due to attended faces were better memorized because subjects could not recall which face had been attended to. Collectively, our finding suggests that MEE can be modulated by selective attention but not visual awareness.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2014

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×