August 2014
Volume 14, Issue 10
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2014
Can a competition between grouping principles be resolved without attention?
Author Affiliations
  • Einat Rashal
    Institution of Information Processing and Decision Making, Department of Psychology, University of Haifa
  • Yaffa Yeshurun
    Institution of Information Processing and Decision Making, Department of Psychology, University of Haifa
  • Ruth Kimchi
    Institution of Information Processing and Decision Making, Department of Psychology, University of Haifa
Journal of Vision August 2014, Vol.14, 805. doi:10.1167/14.10.805
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Einat Rashal, Yaffa Yeshurun, Ruth Kimchi; Can a competition between grouping principles be resolved without attention?. Journal of Vision 2014;14(10):805. doi: 10.1167/14.10.805.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

The goal of the present study was to examine whether attention is required for resolving the competition between two grouping principles operating on the same elements in the display. To this end, we used an inattention paradigm, in which the observer's attention was focused on a central task while irrelevant grouping displays were presented in the unattended background. The background displays were organized into two organizations, each of which was previously found to occur under inattention when presented alone: grouping into shapes (square/triangle) by element connectedness, and grouping into rows/columns by color similarity. On each trial, participants performed a demanding change-detection task on a small target matrix at fixation. Independently of any change in the target, the unattended grouping organizations in the background could change or stay the same, independently in each of the grouping organizations, creating congruency relations between the central target and the background organizations. Congruency effects were expected if the background organizations could be achieved under inattention. However, if the competition between grouping principles cannot be resolved without attention, congruency effects are not expected to emerge. We found that changes in the background organization by connectedness produced congruency effects upon the accuracy of the target-change judgments: target 'same' responses were more accurate when the background shape stayed the same than when it changed, and target 'different' responses were more accurate when the shape changed than when it stayed the same. However, no congruency effect was found for the organization by color similarity. When probed with surprise questions, participants could not report the organization on which the target appeared in the preceding display or whether the organization had changed on the preceding trial, confirming the condition of inattention. These results suggest that the competition between grouping principles can be resolved without attention.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2014

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×