August 2014
Volume 14, Issue 10
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2014
The effect of gain adaptation on the sensitivity of human perceptual judgements.
Author Affiliations
  • Santiago Herce Castañón
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford
  • Samuel Cheadle
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford
  • Konstantinos Tsetsos
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford
  • Christopher Summerfield
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford
Journal of Vision August 2014, Vol.14, 875. doi:10.1167/14.10.875
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Santiago Herce Castañón, Samuel Cheadle, Konstantinos Tsetsos, Christopher Summerfield; The effect of gain adaptation on the sensitivity of human perceptual judgements.. Journal of Vision 2014;14(10):875. doi: 10.1167/14.10.875.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Visual categorisation judgments often involve integrating multiple samples of information that occur in series. Some behavioural and neural studies suggest that evidence that is expected wield greater influence over decisions than evidence that is unexpected, whereas other studies have observed the converse. Here, we set out to test whether expected or unexpected samples are processed with higher gain using a hybrid detection/integration task. 10 healthy human participants viewed a stream of between 1 and 8 Gabor patches in rapid succession, with a view to later estimating the average tilt of the distribution from which they were drawn. Distribution means fell close to +45 degrees or -45 degrees from vertical. To-be-categorised streams were succeeded by a stimulus that either contained (signal present trials) or did not contain (signal absent trials) a target Gabor patch embedded in noise, and prior to estimation participants judged whether the signal was present or absent; detection performance was titrated to approximately d’=1 on average. Target Gabors were either tilted consistently or inconsistently with the to-be-estimated category mean. Surprisingly, we found that Gabors inconsistent with category information were detected with heightened sensitivity. These findings are inconsistent with Bayesian models of perceptual inference, and suggest a heightened sensitivity to erroneous or unexpected information.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2014

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×