August 2014
Volume 14, Issue 10
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2014
A dichoptic action videogame improves the resolution of the amblyopic eye during binocular game play.
Author Affiliations
  • Dennis Levi
    School of Optometry and Vision Science Graduate Group, University of California, Berkeley
  • Indu Vedamurthy
    University of Rochester Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences
  • Mor Nahum
    School of Optometry and Vision Science Graduate Group, University of California, Berkeley
  • Sam Huang
    University of Rochester Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences
  • Jessica Bayliss
    Rochester Institute of Technology, Computer Science Department
  • Daphne Bavelier
    University of Rochester Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences
Journal of Vision August 2014, Vol.14, 959. doi:10.1167/14.10.959
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Dennis Levi, Indu Vedamurthy, Mor Nahum, Sam Huang, Jessica Bayliss, Daphne Bavelier; A dichoptic action videogame improves the resolution of the amblyopic eye during binocular game play.. Journal of Vision 2014;14(10):959. doi: 10.1167/14.10.959.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Playing action videogames with the amblyopic eye results in improved visual acuity, Vernier acuity, visual counting and in some anisometropic amblyopes, stereo acuity in adults with amblyopia (Li et al., 2011). To promote binocular fusion and stereopsis we developed a customized dichoptic action videogame game in which: i) the input to the two eyes is balanced by reducing the luminance of the non-amblyopic eye's image, and ii) the images to the two eyes are viewed in a mirror stereoscope, enabling fusion. To assess performance during game play we embedded a Gabor orientation discrimination task into the game. Importantly, the Gabor patch is only presented to the amblyopic eye, and its spatial frequency adapts to the resolution level of the player (the highest spatial frequency that the observer is able to discriminate), enabling us to monitor the amblyopic eye's resolution during binocular game play. Twenty-three adults with amblyopia played the game for 40 hours. All but one improved in visual acuity (by, on average, a factor of 1.4) and nine improved in stereopsis. The Interocular Luminance Ratio (ILR – the ratio of non-amblyopic eye to amblyopic eye luminance), a measure of suppression, showed a decrease in suppression by about a factor of 1.6, with a different time course in anisometropic and strabismic amblyopes. Importantly, the resolution of the amblyopic eye during binocular game play increased by a factor of 2.2, suggesting a reduction in suppression. Interestingly, the improved visual acuity and stereopsis were not significantly correlated with either the increased resolution, or decreased suppression in a binocular setting during game play. These results indicate that while reduced suppression or increased resolution may be necessary for improvements in stereopsis, they are not sufficient, calling for a more direct training of stereopsis in the next generation of video games for amblyopic patients.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2014

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×