August 2014
Volume 14, Issue 10
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2014
Color-motion feature binding errors are mediated by a higher-order chromatic representation
Author Affiliations
  • Wei Wang
    Psychology, The University of Chicago
  • Steven Shevell
    Psychology, The University of Chicago
Journal of Vision August 2014, Vol.14, 995. doi:10.1167/14.10.995
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      Wei Wang, Steven Shevell; Color-motion feature binding errors are mediated by a higher-order chromatic representation. Journal of Vision 2014;14(10):995. doi: 10.1167/14.10.995.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: Recent work shows that chromatic similarity between central and peripheral moving objects regulates the frequency of color-motion binding errors in the periphery (Wang & Shevell, VSS 2012). This study tested whether chromatic similarity is determined by independent chromatic representations on the l=L/(L+M) and s=S/(L+M) cardinal axes, or instead by a higher-order chromatic representation. METHODS: The stimulus had moving objects in central and peripheral fields. In the central field, half the objects moved in one vertical direction and had one chromaticity, and the other half moved in the opposite direction and had a different chromaticity (e.g., red objects moved upward, green objects downward). In the periphery, moving objects had opposite directions (red downward, green upward). The chromaticity of green objects was constant (l=0.614, s=0.20) in both center and periphery, while the chromaticity of 'red' objects was varied in two conditions: (1) fixed in the periphery at (l=0.800, s=0.20), while in the center varied along the l axis (from 0.800 to 0.665, in separate runs) with s fixed at 0.20; (2) fixed in the periphery at (l=0.800, s=1.00), while in the center again varied in the same steps along the l axis with s fixed at 1.00. The proportion of viewing time with peripheral color-motion binding errors (red objects perceived to move opposite to their physical motion direction) was compared in these two conditions. RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of color-motion binding errors for a given l difference between center and periphery in condition 1 (with s fixed at 0.20) was different than in condition 2 (s at 1.00) (p<.05 for each of 3 observers), even though there was zero s-difference in both conditions. Therefore, color-motion feature binding does not depend solely on independent central-peripheral differences in l and in s. This implies color-motion binding depends on a more specific, higher-order chromatic representation.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2014

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