August 2014
Volume 14, Issue 10
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2014
Accounting for subjective time expansion based on a decision, rather than perceptual, mechanism
Author Affiliations
  • Rakesh Sengupta
    Center for Neural and Cognitive Sciences (CNCS), University of Hyderabad, India
  • S. Bapiraju
    Center for Neural and Cognitive Sciences (CNCS), University of Hyderabad, India
  • Prajit Basu
    Center for Neural and Cognitive Sciences (CNCS), University of Hyderabad, India
  • David Melcher
    Center for Mind/Brain Sciences (CiMEC), University of Trento, Italy
Journal of Vision August 2014, Vol.14, 1150. doi:10.1167/14.10.1150
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      Rakesh Sengupta, S. Bapiraju, Prajit Basu, David Melcher; Accounting for subjective time expansion based on a decision, rather than perceptual, mechanism. Journal of Vision 2014;14(10):1150. doi: 10.1167/14.10.1150.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Events have a subjective duration. It remains an open question whether duration is perceived directly, like a visual feature, or depends mainly on a comparison process. Numerous studies have shown that subjective time experience depends on low-level visual properties and also the attentional focus. In the oddball paradigm, Tse et al (2004) reported that duration judgments for stimuli longer than 120 ms showed temporal expansion. We used a computational model to determine whether a decision-based account of temporal judgments could account for temporal expansion. We used a single layer recurrent dynamic on-center off-surround network of fully connected nodes with self-excitation and lateral inhibition (based on Usher and Cohen, 1999) optimized for winner-take-all dynamics for duration judgements. The 'winner' node, out of the two that receive the inputs of different duration values, determines the duration judgement. One node received the habituated input (standard) and the other received novel input (oddball). We ran a simulation over a range of durations (from 30 ms to 1200 ms) in order to calculate the subjective expansion factor for these durations if they were used as standard duration for oddball trials. The simulation results closely match the pattern of experimental results collected by Tse et al (2004), including the 120 ms cutoff for TSE. These findings suggest that the TSE effect might arise out of comparison process rather than perceived difference in time itself.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2014

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