August 2014
Volume 14, Issue 10
Free
Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2014
Comparative connectivity of frontal eye field and striatum between humans and macaques
Author Affiliations
  • Michelle Young
    Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt Vision Research Center, Center for Integrative and Cognitive Neuroscience, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37240, United States
  • Bas Neggers
    Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Dept. of Psychiatry, University Medical Centre Utrecht, the Netherlands
  • Bram Zandbelt
    Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt Vision Research Center, Center for Integrative and Cognitive Neuroscience, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37240, United States
  • Jeffrey Schall
    Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt Vision Research Center, Center for Integrative and Cognitive Neuroscience, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37240, United States
Journal of Vision August 2014, Vol.14, 1217. doi:10.1167/14.10.1217
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Michelle Young, Bas Neggers, Bram Zandbelt, Jeffrey Schall; Comparative connectivity of frontal eye field and striatum between humans and macaques. Journal of Vision 2014;14(10):1217. doi: 10.1167/14.10.1217.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Classically, the cortico-basal ganglia circuits has been described in terms of segregated ocular motor and skeletal motor loops. The ocular motor loop begins with projections from the frontal eye fields (FEF) to the caudate nucleus, and the skeletal motor loop begins with projections from the motor cortex (M1) to the putamen. This description has been guided by anatomical and physiological findings in macaques. Recent neuroimaging studies of the human FEF reveal inconsistencies with this organization. Using probabilistic diffusion tractography, we compared the in-vivo pattern of connectivity between humans and macaques. Nine healthy humans were scanned at the UMC Utrecht. Nine healthy adult macaques were scanned at Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science. All subjects were imaged in the same type of scanner (Phillips Achieva 3T) with similar pulse sequences and analysis pipelines. We found that the FEF cortico-strial pathways differed between macaques and humans. In macaques the FEF is connected with the head of the caudate and dorsomedial putamen, in agreement with neuroanatomical tract tracer findings. However, in humans FEF is connected to posterior putamen and a small portion of the caudate body. The differences in connectivity may be explained by the evolutionary expansion of prefrontal projections to striatum in humans.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2014

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×