August 2014
Volume 14, Issue 10
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Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting Abstract  |   August 2014
Invisible Chromatic Gratings Can Induce Orientation-Specific Adaptation and Binocular Rivalry
Author Affiliations
  • Jinyou Zou
    State Key Lab of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences
  • Sheng He
    State Key Lab of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences
  • Peng Zhang
    State Key Lab of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences
Journal of Vision August 2014, Vol.14, 1237. doi:10.1167/14.10.1237
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      Jinyou Zou, Sheng He, Peng Zhang; Invisible Chromatic Gratings Can Induce Orientation-Specific Adaptation and Binocular Rivalry . Journal of Vision 2014;14(10):1237. doi: 10.1167/14.10.1237.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Binocular rivalry arises when incompatible patterns of stimuli were dichoptically presented. Previously, we found that spatial attention is necessary for dichoptic images to be engaged in sustained rivalry (Zhang et al, 2011). The current study examined whether binocular rivalry can be induced from stimuli with invisible spatial patterns. Counterphase flickering red/green chromatic gratings were adopted as stimuli. At 30Hz flickering frequency, the red/green gratings were perceived as stable uniform yellow. In experiment 1, following adaptation to an invisible chromatic grating, observers perceived a significant tilt after effect and also had an orientation-specific detection threshold elevation. In experiment 2, with one eye presented with a low contrast static red/green grating, the fellow eye was presented with, all perceptually matched, either a invisible flickering red/green grating, flickering uniform red/green patches, or a static uniform yellow patch. Observers reported their perceptual experience using button presses: the low contrast grating, part of the grating, or uniform yellow. Result showed that the total duration for seeing the uniform yellow was slightly but significantly longer when the stimulus in the fellow eye was an invisible grating, compared to the other two control conditions without spatial pattern. Together these results show that the chromatic grating rendered invisible due to fast flicker can induce orientation-specific adaptation as well as enhance interocular competition.

Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2014

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